Monthly Archives: January 2014

Edith Wharton in the News: Around the Web, January 2014

whartondogsA visit to the cemetery at The Mount where Wharton’s dogs are buried (Flavorwire)

Edith Wharton’s 1915 Paris Motor Vehicle Permit, at the Beinecke Library

Birthday Tributes

Edith Wharton Society Awards and Prizes (Deadlines: Various, April and May 2014)

Research Awards

The Edith Wharton Society announces two research awards for 2014-15:

1. Edith Wharton Collection Research Award
Deadline: April 15, 2014

Each year the Edith Wharton Society offers an Edith Wharton Collection Research Award to enable a scholar to conduct research on the Edith Wharton Collection of materials at the Beinecke Library at Yale University. The Award for 2014-15 is $500.

Prospective fellows for the 2014-2015 award are asked to submit a research proposal (maximum length 5 single-spaced pages) and a CV by the deadline to

Meredith Goldsmith
Department of English
Ursinus College
601 E. Main Street
Collegeville, PA 19426-1000
mgoldsmith@ursinus.edu

The research proposal should detail the overall research project, its particular contribution to Wharton scholarship, the preparation the candidate brings to the project, and the specific relevance that materials at the Beinecke collection have for its completion. Funds must be used for transportation, lodging, and other expenses related to a stay at the library. Notification of the award will take place by April 15th and the award can be used from May 1, 2014 until May 1, 2015. A final report will be due June 1, 2015 The Winner will be asked at that point to submit a short report essay to the Edith Wharton Review, which will briefly inform the readers of the EWR of the research done but will not preclude the winner publishing a scholarly article based on their research at the Beinecke.

2. Edith Wharton Essay Prize

Instituted in the fall of 2005, the Edith Wharton Essay Prize is awarded annually for the best unpublished essay on Edith Wharton by a beginning scholar. Graduate students, independent scholars, and faculty members who have not held a tenure-track or full-time appointment for more than four years are eligible to submit their work. The winning and second-place essays will be published in The Edith Wharton Review, a peer-reviewed journal indexed in the MLA Bibliography , and the writer will receive an award of $250.

All entries will be considered for publication in The Edith Wharton Review as well as for the Edith Wharton Essay Prize. Submissions should be 20-30 pages and should follow the 7th edition MLA style, using endnotes, not footnotes. Applicants should not identify themselves on the manuscript but should provide a separate cover page that includes their names, academic status, e-mail address, postal addresses, and the notation “The Edith Wharton Essay Prize.”

To submit an essay for the prize, send copies of articles as anonymized word attachments, plus a cover letter with contact information, to The Edith Wharton Review by April 15, 2014:

Meredith Goldsmith
Department of English
Ursinus College
601 E. Main Street
Collegeville, PA 19426-1000
mgoldsmith@ursinus.edu

3. Undergraduate Research Prize

In 2014, the Edith Wharton Society is launching a prize for undergraduate research on Edith Wharton. We seek critical essays by undergraduates from institutions of all kinds, focusing on works by Wharton in all genres. Students at all levels are eligible to submit. Papers should be 15 pages maximum.The winning essay will be published on the Wharton Society website and the author will receive an award of $100.

To submit an essay for the prize, send copies of articles as anonymized word attachments, plus a cover letter with contact information to the following address by May 1, 2014:

Meredith Goldsmith
President, Edith Wharton Society
Department of English
Ursinus College
601 E. Main Street
Collegeville, PA 19426-1000
mgoldsmith@ursinus.edu

CFP: Dickinson Institute (Deadline 2.1.2014)

From Emily Orlando:

Call for Papers: Dickinson Institute

On Friday, August 8th, 2014, the EDIS “Dickinson Institute” will be held in Amherst, Massachusetts. The topic is “Emily Dickinson and New England Writers.” Individuals doing work on Dickinson’s relationship to other writers of her region should send 250-word abstracts of a paper to Elizabeth Petrino (EPetrino@fairfield.edu) and Alexandra Socarides (socaridesa@missouri.edu) by February 1, 2014. Accepted participants will be notified by Feb. 28th and will be asked to circulate completed, conference-length (8-10 page) papers to a small group by June 15th. Members will meet at the Institute with this group to discuss their work in detail. The Institute will also involve a plenary speaker and a gathering of all Institute members at its close to reflect on their work and the larger themes of the conference. The Institute is scheduled for the first day of the Emily Dickinson Annual Meeting, which all participants are welcome to attend.

Edith Wharton in the News: Real Estate of The Age of Innocence

From the New York Times: A Pair of Bluebloods With Blueprints

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/05/realestate/real-estate-of-edith-wartons-the-age-of-innocence.html?_r=0

Lienau Collection/Avery Architectural Library

Rowhouses built by Rebecca Jones stood on the east side of Fifth Avenue, from 55th to 56th Street, in 1870.

By Published: January 2, 2014

Edith Wharton’s corpulent great-aunt Mary Mason Jones served as one of the most memorable inspirations in literary New York: the model for Mrs. Manson Mingott in Wharton’s novel “The Age of Innocence.”

The row built by her sister Mary Mason Jones two blocks north, looking south from 58th, in 1899. Mary Mason Jones and her house figure prominently in “The Age of Innocence,” a book by the sisters’ great-niece Edith Wharton.

Much of the 1920 book is centered on Mary Jones’s remarkable row of stone houses on Fifth Avenue, from 57th to 58th Street. But almost absent from Wharton’s writings is Mary’s sister Rebecca Jones, who built an equally impressive row just two blocks south.

The father of Rebecca, born in 1801, and Mary, born the year before, was John Mason, a founder of the New York and Harlem Railroad, which first ran in 1832. Rebecca married Isaac Colford Jones Jr., and Mary his cousin, also named Isaac Jones.

Rebecca and Mary early exhibited a taste for domestic proximity, occupying neighboring rowhouses on Chambers Street. No. 122, Mary’s place, supposedly had the first bathtub in New York; Rebecca’s ablutionary activities are not documented.

Later, three Jones families, including Rebecca and Mary’s, occupied three adjoining houses from 732 to 736 Broadway, in which the entertaining rooms could be opened to one another.

It is not clear where the sisters lived after 1854, when a nasty fight over their father’s estate, much of it property in New York City, was resolved. They were awarded two city blocks, each running from Fifth to Park, where streets had just recently been cut through. Rebecca’s domain was between 55th and 56th, Mary’s between 57th and 58th. These are where their architectural aspirations played out shortly after Wharton’s birth in 1862.

Mary started first, her architect, Robert Mook, filing plans in 1867 for what became Marble Row, a sparkling-white series of houses in the Parisian style facing Fifth from 57th to 58th. These houses take up a great deal of real estate in both the book and movie “Age of Innocence.”

Rebecca followed in 1869, when she had her architect, Detlef Lienau, design a similar row of eight houses for the 55th-to-56th-Street block, completed in 1871. These were more chaste than Mary’s, in part because of their olive-colored Ohio stone, but they, too, had the character of something on a Parisian boulevard.

[Read the rest at The New York Times link above]

Edith Wharton in the News: Bunner Sisters Staged Reading in New York (January 2014)

bunnersistersBunner Sisters

A Staged Reading Adaptation Based on the Edith Wharton novella
Written and directed by Linda Selman
Presented as a part of Metropolitan Playhouse Gilded Age Festival

January 14 at 7 pm
January 18 at 1 pm
January 23 at 7 pm
January 25 at 7 pm

Metropolitan Playhouse
220 East 4th Street
New York, NY 10009

Tickets:
1-800-838-3006
www.metropolitanplayhouse.org/tickets