Category Archives: Uncategorized

Age of Innocence Opera

Below is an excerpt from the opera The Age of an Innocence, music and libretto by David Carpenter, performed in New York in November 2013. In this pivotal scene, Ellen consents to spend one night with Newland before she returns to Europe. Newland, convinced that once he has her, she’ll not be able to leave him, sings the following aria:

CFP: Dickinson Institute (Deadline 2.1.2014)

From Emily Orlando:

Call for Papers: Dickinson Institute

On Friday, August 8th, 2014, the EDIS “Dickinson Institute” will be held in Amherst, Massachusetts. The topic is “Emily Dickinson and New England Writers.” Individuals doing work on Dickinson’s relationship to other writers of her region should send 250-word abstracts of a paper to Elizabeth Petrino (EPetrino@fairfield.edu) and Alexandra Socarides (socaridesa@missouri.edu) by February 1, 2014. Accepted participants will be notified by Feb. 28th and will be asked to circulate completed, conference-length (8-10 page) papers to a small group by June 15th. Members will meet at the Institute with this group to discuss their work in detail. The Institute will also involve a plenary speaker and a gathering of all Institute members at its close to reflect on their work and the larger themes of the conference. The Institute is scheduled for the first day of the Emily Dickinson Annual Meeting, which all participants are welcome to attend.

CFP: ALA 2014 Calls for Papers (Deadline: 1.15.2014)

The Edith Wharton Society will sponsor two panels at the American Literature Association in 2014.

1. Call for Papers, American Literature Association (ALA)
Washington, DC
May 22-25, 2014
Edith Wharton and the Natural World
The Edith Wharton Society invites papers addressing Edith Wharton’s relationship to the natural world.  Presentations might address Wharton’s engagements with nature, nature writers, landscapes, the environment, and so on.  Especially welcome will be papers focusing on Wharton’s work with dogs (e.g., Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, such fictional works as “Kerfol,” her own beloved papillons, etc).  Please send abstracts and a brief bio to Emily Orlando at eorlando@fairfield.edu by January 15, 2014.

2. 

Call for Papers, American Literature Association (ALA) Washington, D.C.
May 22-25, 2014
Wharton and Masculinities

The Edith Wharton Society invites paper proposals that consider Wharton’s interest in constructions of masculinity.  Papers might address normative and non-normative masculinities, historical approaches to men’s cultures and subcultures, male figures in relation to Wharton’s narrative technique, men’s imagined and real spaces (including, but not limited to, interiors, decors, architectural plans, and gardens), nationalized iterations of manhood, and social as well as homosocial relationships between men in Wharton’s work.  Send proposals and one-page CVs to Melanie Dawson at mvdaws@wm.edu by January 15, 2014.

Edith Wharton in the News: Bride and Conqueror (at WSJ on The Custom of the Country)

Frorm The Wall Street Journal

Bride and Conqueror

By 
LEONARD CASSUTO
Dec. 13, 2013 4:12 p.m. ET

The Gilded Age has memorialized many successful and pruriently colorful businessmen in fact and fiction, but one of the canniest and most ruthless of them is a woman. Edith Wharton’s “The Custom of the Country” turned 100 this year, and the adventures of its heroine, Undine Spragg, remain as brazen today as when she first advanced upon the American scene.

Ms. Wharton set nearly all of her novels in the drawing rooms and country estates of the New York rich. In her hands, high society became a decorous killing floor, and a marketplace as freewheeling as the industrial postbellum economy in the U.S. at large.

Christopher Serra

The market in Ms. Wharton’s books is the marriage market. Ms. Wharton plumbed the analogy between the social and business worlds deeply, rendering courtship and marriage as cold and calculated exchanges for profit. “The emotional center of gravity’s not the same” as in the old days, notes one of the characters in “Custom.” Once it was love, but now it’s business. Ms. Wharton’s novels of manners are not marriage plots so much as business narratives.

[read more at the link above]

New Book: American Writers in Europe: 1850 to the Present

ImageWriters in Europe: 1850 to the Present. Edited by Ferdâ Asya. Palgrave Macmillan, 2013.

http://us.macmillan.com/americanwritersineurope

The chapters on the works of Nathaniel Parker Willis, E.D.E.N. Southworth, Gertrude Atherton, John Cournos, Edith Wharton, Muriel Rukeyser, Langston Hughes, Edwin Rolfe, John Ashbery, Adrienne Rich, Richard Wilbur, Allen Ginsberg, Harriet Welty Rochefort, and Suzy Gershman, explore the impartial critical outlook that American writers acquired in different parts of Europe, from 1850 to the present, and used as a lens to view Europe and America. Focusing on some less familiar writers, they reveal intriguing aspects of the lives and works of American writers than those of the customarily anthologized expatriates. Offering a broad range of American experiences in Europe in an extensive span of time, the book widens the history of the transatlantic cultural and literary dialogue between America and Europe.