Category Archives: Uncategorized

Query about Edith Wharton Essay Prize and Undergraduate Prize

I’m inquiring regarding the Edith Wharton Essay Prize and the Edith Wharton Undergraduate Essay Prize. I see that the EWEP hasn’t been awarded since 2011. Is the prize being phased out, or is this merely a result of no submissions winning? If you are still accepting submissions for the EWEP, does the inauguration of the EWUEP signal that undergraduates may not apply for the EWEP at all, and must instead limit themselves to entries for the undergraduate prize? Or would you consider entries for the EWEP from undergraduates, provided they were of appropriate length and publication-ready?

Thank you very much for your time,

Alexander Kraft

****

The Edith Wharton Essay Prize page has been updated to reflect recent winners. Undergraduates wouldn’t be eligible because of this requirement: “Graduate students, independent scholars, and faculty members who have not held a tenure-track or full-time appointment for more than four years are eligible to submit their work.”

The Undergraduate Essay Prize began in 2014, and the requirements are here: http://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/awards/edith-wharton-undergraduate-essay-prize/

Thank you for your interest in these prizes.

Calls for Papers: EWS Panels at American Literature Association (ALA) May 2015, Boston, MA. Deadline: 15 January 2015

Calls for Papers: EWS Panels at American Literature Association (ALA) May 2015, Boston, MA.  Deadline: 15 January 2015

Cultural Exchange in Edith Wharton’s Life and Work

An intensely international writer, Edith Wharton thought about cultural boundaries, exchanges, and explication throughout her life and work.  Her travel, her expatriate life-style, her multilingual abilities, her interest in anthropological and cultural explication all helped place cultural exchange at the center of her writing and life. This panel seeks papers that address any aspect of Wharton’s engagement with cultural exchange, be it cultural explication, translation, encounters, or actual exchanges.  It is also open to examinations of translations of Wharton, relations of Wharton to other writers in cross-cultural ways, and critical receptions of Wharton across cultural boundaries. Please send 250-500 page proposals and 1 page cvs to Hildegard Hoeller at hildegard.hoeller@gmail.com  by 15 January 2015.

Edith Wharton and the First World War

In her autobiography A Backward Glance Edith Wharton recalls “the dark bewildering days of August 1914” that she experienced as a resident of Paris at the outbreak of World War I. The war drove Wharton to take up relief work for refugees, travel to the front, and scold her native country for its belated participation in the war. Wharton responded in journalism, fiction, and poetry that familiarized Americans with the country they were protecting and depicted the human and cultural loss caused by the conflict. This panel seeks papers that consider any aspect of Wharton’s multiform response to World War I. Papers might address Wharton’s sympathetic depictions of French culture in non-fiction works like Fighting France: From Dunkerque to Belport, and French Ways and Their Meanings, or works of fiction such as The Marne, A Son at the Front, and The Mother’s Recompense. Also welcome are comparative papers on Wharton’s war related writings and better-known works on the war by Hemingway, Woolf, Dos Passos, Barbusse, and others, as well as the relation of Wharton’s war reportage to that of other women.  Please send 250-500 word proposals and short CVs to Paul Ohler at Paul.Ohler@kpu.ca by 15 January 2015.

Age of Innocence Opera

Below is an excerpt from the opera The Age of an Innocence, music and libretto by David Carpenter, performed in New York in November 2013. In this pivotal scene, Ellen consents to spend one night with Newland before she returns to Europe. Newland, convinced that once he has her, she’ll not be able to leave him, sings the following aria:

CFP: Dickinson Institute (Deadline 2.1.2014)

From Emily Orlando:

Call for Papers: Dickinson Institute

On Friday, August 8th, 2014, the EDIS “Dickinson Institute” will be held in Amherst, Massachusetts. The topic is “Emily Dickinson and New England Writers.” Individuals doing work on Dickinson’s relationship to other writers of her region should send 250-word abstracts of a paper to Elizabeth Petrino (EPetrino@fairfield.edu) and Alexandra Socarides (socaridesa@missouri.edu) by February 1, 2014. Accepted participants will be notified by Feb. 28th and will be asked to circulate completed, conference-length (8-10 page) papers to a small group by June 15th. Members will meet at the Institute with this group to discuss their work in detail. The Institute will also involve a plenary speaker and a gathering of all Institute members at its close to reflect on their work and the larger themes of the conference. The Institute is scheduled for the first day of the Emily Dickinson Annual Meeting, which all participants are welcome to attend.

CFP: ALA 2014 Calls for Papers (Deadline: 1.15.2014)

The Edith Wharton Society will sponsor two panels at the American Literature Association in 2014.

1. Call for Papers, American Literature Association (ALA)
Washington, DC
May 22-25, 2014
Edith Wharton and the Natural World
The Edith Wharton Society invites papers addressing Edith Wharton’s relationship to the natural world.  Presentations might address Wharton’s engagements with nature, nature writers, landscapes, the environment, and so on.  Especially welcome will be papers focusing on Wharton’s work with dogs (e.g., Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, such fictional works as “Kerfol,” her own beloved papillons, etc).  Please send abstracts and a brief bio to Emily Orlando at eorlando@fairfield.edu by January 15, 2014.

2. 

Call for Papers, American Literature Association (ALA) Washington, D.C.
May 22-25, 2014
Wharton and Masculinities

The Edith Wharton Society invites paper proposals that consider Wharton’s interest in constructions of masculinity.  Papers might address normative and non-normative masculinities, historical approaches to men’s cultures and subcultures, male figures in relation to Wharton’s narrative technique, men’s imagined and real spaces (including, but not limited to, interiors, decors, architectural plans, and gardens), nationalized iterations of manhood, and social as well as homosocial relationships between men in Wharton’s work.  Send proposals and one-page CVs to Melanie Dawson at mvdaws@wm.edu by January 15, 2014.

Edith Wharton in the News: Bride and Conqueror (at WSJ on The Custom of the Country)

Frorm The Wall Street Journal

Bride and Conqueror

By 
LEONARD CASSUTO
Dec. 13, 2013 4:12 p.m. ET

The Gilded Age has memorialized many successful and pruriently colorful businessmen in fact and fiction, but one of the canniest and most ruthless of them is a woman. Edith Wharton’s “The Custom of the Country” turned 100 this year, and the adventures of its heroine, Undine Spragg, remain as brazen today as when she first advanced upon the American scene.

Ms. Wharton set nearly all of her novels in the drawing rooms and country estates of the New York rich. In her hands, high society became a decorous killing floor, and a marketplace as freewheeling as the industrial postbellum economy in the U.S. at large.

Christopher Serra

The market in Ms. Wharton’s books is the marriage market. Ms. Wharton plumbed the analogy between the social and business worlds deeply, rendering courtship and marriage as cold and calculated exchanges for profit. “The emotional center of gravity’s not the same” as in the old days, notes one of the characters in “Custom.” Once it was love, but now it’s business. Ms. Wharton’s novels of manners are not marriage plots so much as business narratives.

[read more at the link above]