Category Archives: Wharton in the News

The Mount’s Gardens Sustain Major Damage from Record-breaking Rainstorm

From Irene Goldman-Price:

Screen Shot 2014-06-27 at 11.10.10 AM

Storm Damage at The Mount

NEWS FROM THE MOUNT

 On Wednesday evening, the Berkshires experienced a torrential storm that dropped over 5 inches in the course of several hours. Unfortunately, The Mount and parts of nearby Lenoxdale received the brunt of the storm. Our entrance drive was badly damaged and some of the garden pathways and the French Flower garden nearly destroyed. We are still assessing the damage and coming up with a plan of action. The press and the community have been very responsive. I am attaching the press release we issued as well as some comparative photos. The repairs, I am afraid, are going to be many thousands of dollars and we will need to mount an emergency campaign as there are not funds in our operating budget to absorb a calamity of this magnitude. I will keep you posted as we know more.  Please share this email with your friends and colleagues to help build our community of support. Continue reading

Of interest to NYC Edith Wharton Fans: Roadtrip to The Mount

Lit Crawl NYC is hosting a roadtrip from NYC to the Edith Wharton estate in the Berkshires on Sunday, June 22.

We’ve chartered a bus with seats for 50. If members of your organization are interested, we’d love to have you.

Tickets are $45 until 6/11. (Available here: http://ow.ly/xFa5A ) Please spread the word to other bibliophiles.

Best regards,
Camille Davies-Mandel
camille@litcrawl.org
www.litcrawl.org/nyc

Wharton in the News: From The Guardian (1936): Lillian Gish on portraying Charlotte in the stage version of The Old Maid

http://www.theguardian.com/theguardian/the-northerner/2014/mar/17/lillian-gish-theatre-review-silent-films

Lillian Gish

Edith Wharton’s novel “The Old Maid” is to be seen at the Opera House in the hands of a remarkably good cast. The play ended last night with long-continued applause, which had the effect of bringing back repeatedly the two great characters, Lillian Gish and Carol Goodner.

It is easy to be suspicious of chronicle plays which begin in the 1830s and end in the 1850s, particularly when they deal with old maids. The old maids who know everything are a nuisance, the ones who know nothing are worse. But here we have no type but a collection of human beings, having substance and feeling, in one of those situations with which Edith Wharton proved it is not necessary to have melodrama or murder to awake sensibility and make tragedy visible. The storm can rise as well in a teacup as elsewhere.

. . .

Miss Gish played her part with extraordinary skill, moving by the gentlest accretions from the ardent girl of the first act to the tortured, frightened woman preparing for her daughter’s wedding and shaken by her secret. Those who have tears to shed in the theatre could scarcely withhold them for her piteous state at the ending of this play.

Edith Wharton Collection at the Beinecke Library to close temporarily beginning in April 2014

From Gary Totten: 

Various Archival Collections to Close Temporarily Beginning in April 2014

Beginning in April 2014, the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library will temporarily close various archival collections in preparation for a major building renovation scheduled to start in May 2015. In general, collections that are temporarily closed will be unavailable for six to eight weeks.

Researchers planning to visit the Beinecke should consult the library’s closed collections schedule beforehand to confirm the availability of desired materials. The schedule is currently subject to change, so researchers should check it frequently as they plan their visits.

Over the next year, the library will transfer about 12,000 cartons of collection material to an offsite shelving facility. This work requires the temporary closing of many of the library’s most important and frequently consulted archival collections. While temporarily closed, the collections will be unavailable for consultation in the reading room, classrooms, or for reproduction requests.

The temporary closings will be staggered throughout the year. Among collections slated to close in the spring of 2014 are the papers of Thornton Wilder, Eugene O’Neill, H.D., Langston Hughes, James Weldon and Grace Nail Johnson, and Edith Wharton. Collections to close in the fall of 2014 include the papers of Mable Dodge Luhan, Ezra Pound, Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, and Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O’Keeffe.

Edith Wharton in the News: Around the Web, January 2014

whartondogsA visit to the cemetery at The Mount where Wharton’s dogs are buried (Flavorwire)

Edith Wharton’s 1915 Paris Motor Vehicle Permit, at the Beinecke Library

Birthday Tributes

Edith Wharton in the News: Real Estate of The Age of Innocence

From the New York Times: A Pair of Bluebloods With Blueprints

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/01/05/realestate/real-estate-of-edith-wartons-the-age-of-innocence.html?_r=0

Lienau Collection/Avery Architectural Library

Rowhouses built by Rebecca Jones stood on the east side of Fifth Avenue, from 55th to 56th Street, in 1870.

By Published: January 2, 2014

Edith Wharton’s corpulent great-aunt Mary Mason Jones served as one of the most memorable inspirations in literary New York: the model for Mrs. Manson Mingott in Wharton’s novel “The Age of Innocence.”

The row built by her sister Mary Mason Jones two blocks north, looking south from 58th, in 1899. Mary Mason Jones and her house figure prominently in “The Age of Innocence,” a book by the sisters’ great-niece Edith Wharton.

Much of the 1920 book is centered on Mary Jones’s remarkable row of stone houses on Fifth Avenue, from 57th to 58th Street. But almost absent from Wharton’s writings is Mary’s sister Rebecca Jones, who built an equally impressive row just two blocks south.

The father of Rebecca, born in 1801, and Mary, born the year before, was John Mason, a founder of the New York and Harlem Railroad, which first ran in 1832. Rebecca married Isaac Colford Jones Jr., and Mary his cousin, also named Isaac Jones.

Rebecca and Mary early exhibited a taste for domestic proximity, occupying neighboring rowhouses on Chambers Street. No. 122, Mary’s place, supposedly had the first bathtub in New York; Rebecca’s ablutionary activities are not documented.

Later, three Jones families, including Rebecca and Mary’s, occupied three adjoining houses from 732 to 736 Broadway, in which the entertaining rooms could be opened to one another.

It is not clear where the sisters lived after 1854, when a nasty fight over their father’s estate, much of it property in New York City, was resolved. They were awarded two city blocks, each running from Fifth to Park, where streets had just recently been cut through. Rebecca’s domain was between 55th and 56th, Mary’s between 57th and 58th. These are where their architectural aspirations played out shortly after Wharton’s birth in 1862.

Mary started first, her architect, Robert Mook, filing plans in 1867 for what became Marble Row, a sparkling-white series of houses in the Parisian style facing Fifth from 57th to 58th. These houses take up a great deal of real estate in both the book and movie “Age of Innocence.”

Rebecca followed in 1869, when she had her architect, Detlef Lienau, design a similar row of eight houses for the 55th-to-56th-Street block, completed in 1871. These were more chaste than Mary’s, in part because of their olive-colored Ohio stone, but they, too, had the character of something on a Parisian boulevard.

[Read the rest at The New York Times link above]