Monthly Archives: September 2018

From Jennifer Haytock: Call for nominations for EWS positions

Dear Edith Wharton Society members,

The Edith Wharton Society is now accepting nominations for the position of 
Secretary and two Members-at-Large, for the 2019-21 term.
 
Secretary
From our Constitution:
“5.4.  The Secretary shall take and distribute minutes of all meetings of the Society and of the Executive Board and shall forward minutes to the Web Master for posting on the society’s web page.  The Secretary shall coordinate the nominations of new members of the board.”
5.7 “To achieve continuity, officers shall ordinarily succeed one another in this order: the Vice-President shall become President, and the Secretary become Vice-President, and the President become the Immediate Past President.”
Member-at-Large
Members-at-Large may be asked to adjudicate the EWS prizes, and they have the option of organizing, or deputizing someone to organize, the guaranteed EW panel at NEMLA, SAMLA, and other regional MLA conferences (5.9).
For further information about these positions, please review our Constitution at
If you have any questions about either position, please also feel free to contact any current Society officer, including President Paul Ohler (paul.ohler@kpu.ca), Vice President Melanie Dawson (mvdaws@wm.edu ), or Secretary Jennifer Haytock (jhaytock@brockport.edu) for further information.
Candidates must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society. Membership dues can be paid here:
Please email Jennifer Haytock with nominations by Wednesday, Sep. 19, 2019. Please include which position you are nominating yourself for and a one-paragraph biography. A voting period will follow the close of the nomination period.
To vote, you must be a member in good standing. I encourage you to check on your membership status (https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/membership/directory/) and update it if necessary.
Sincerely,
Jennifer
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Queries: Introduction of Ellen in TheAge of Innocence

My name is Robin Oliveira. I live in Seattle. I am the author of three books, My Name is Mary Sutter, I Always Loved You, and Winter Sisters, all historical fiction. I hold an MFA in Writing from Vermont College of Fine Arts. I’m researching my next book  and came across your name while perusing the Edith Wharton Society Web site. The book will not be non-fiction, but fiction.
I have a question and I’m wondering whether or not you can either direct me to someone who is an expert on The Age of Innocence, or whether or not you have considered the following question. I realize I’m imposing, and if you are too busy to address my question, thank you for your time, and I understand.
I’ve been studying The Age of Innocence in preparation for my new book. I’m very interested in the role of rumor in the narrative. There are many ways in which rumor works in the novel, but I’ve run into an interesting, almost niggling example. In my close reading of the text, I’ve noticed that Wharton gives three separate descriptions of Countess Olenska’s arrival in NY.
One,  she appears suddenly and without warning: chapter II: Archer knew that she had suddenly arrived from Europe a day or two previously “
Two,  her uncle Mingott went to NY to retrieve her: chapter II: “I believe Lovell Mingott went out to get her….” This is Lefferts.
(Both can’t be true, since Archer is so close by now to the Mingott family that he would have known whether or not Mingott went out to get her. Mingott’s absence and errand would have been known to NYC society.)
And third, all NY knew she was coming: I can’t at this moment, pinpoint it in the text, but there is a reference that says it was known to everyone that she was coming.
MY question is whether or not this inconsistency in the text is something Wharton scholars have discussed to your knowledge? If so, have they concluded that Wharton was deliberate in placing three different explanations of Ellen’s arrival as a subtle machination of rumor in the novel? Or, perhaps it is a way to increase the mystery around the Olenska character? Both seem possible to me. Less possible is that Wharton was careless. The novel is so meticulously crafted that as an author, I doubt she was, but I’m wondering.
Have you an understanding/opinion?
Thank you very much for your time,
Sincerely,
Robin Oliveira

CFP: Edith Wharton Pane at ALA 2019 in Boston (Deadline 12.1.18)

Edith Wharton Society Call for Papers at the American Literature Association
May 23-26, 2019 Boston, MA

Wharton and the Family

The Edith Wharton Society invites proposals for papers on “Wharton and the Family” for inclusion in the ALA 2019 program in Boston. Proposals may approach any aspect of Wharton and the family, including issues of maternity, paternity, childrearing, sibling relationships,  queer families, and more. Papers may also compare Wharton’s representations of families with those of her contemporaries. Titled proposals (approx. 300 words) are due to Jennifer Haytock (jhaytock@brockport.edu) by December 1, 2018. Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference.

Wharton in the News: Shadow of a Doubt Production in New York

Edith Wharton’s

THE SHADOW OF A DOUBT

Monday, January 28, 2019

7:30 PM
Lucille Lortel Theatre

Single Tickets go on-sale October 22.

Directed by Adrienne Campbell-Holt
Featuring  Emily Brown, Kate Burton, Marin Ireland, and Jay O. Sanders and more to be announced!

“My dear, after twenty, all life is pretending, and it’s easier to pretend in a good house, than alone in a garret!” advises Lady Uske, urging our heroine Kate to return home to her husband, in Edith Wharton’s long-lost drama. Written 20 years before The Age of Innocence earned her the first Pulitzer Prize for Literature to be awarded to a woman, Wharton’s The Shadow of a Doubt contains kernels of the socially conscious characters and themes of her later masterpiece novels.

[read the rest at https://www.redbulltheater.com/the-shadow-of-a-doubt]