Category Archives: Announcements

Update: Mock Trial of Ethan Frome (4 PM EST)

The Zoom info and documents for tomorrow’s mock trial of Ethan Frome have gone out on wharton-l https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/membership/wharton-l/

Please find attached each side’s legal brief for tomorrow’s Zoom mock trial, which will start at 4:00 EST.  Pretrial hearings will start at 3:00, so please do not be surprised if there is ongoing activity when you enter Zoom.  The class is both excited and a little intimidated that members of EWS will be in attendance.  If you have any questions, please let me know.

Wharton Queries: Information on In Morocco

My name is Diane, i am journalist from french television station called Arte, a french and german channel : https://www.arte.tv/fr/

We produce a daily cultural show : Invitation au Voyage, broadcasted every day at 4.30 pm. It deals with travel, culture, history and discovery 

https://www.arte.tv/fr/videos/RC-014340/invitation-au-voyage/

I am contacting you because i am preparing a report about Edith Wharton in Morroco. I am currently based in Rabat and i am looking for some documentation, analysis, thesis, any supports, about her trip and i thought that may be you could help me ? 

Name: DIANE ARAGOU

Email:diane.aragou@gmail.com

Edith Wharton Online Event: February Tea with TLW: Dr Emily Orlando on The Decoration of Houses

February Tea with the Transatlantic Literary Women
Dr Emily Orlando on The Decoration of Houses
Wednesday 3 February 2021, 5pm UK time

“Sheltering in Place with Edith Wharton: Re-Reading The Decoration of Houses in a Time of Global Crisis”

Please join us for our February #TeawithTLW when we’re delighted to be joined by renowned Edith Wharton scholar, Dr Emily Orlando.
This month, we’re discussing Edith Wharton – the prominent design writer! Emily will be talking about Wharton’s first book, the hugely influential The Decoration of Houses, which was co-written with the American architect Ogden Codman Jr.
In her talk, Emily will be asking the question: how does Wharton’s design work speak to us anew in a global pandemic?  She will discuss the many ways that the 1897 book resonates with 21st-century readers, providing a new look at one of Wharton’s texts from a contemporary perspective. So, pop the kettle on and make sure you have a snack, to settle in for a wonderful discussion of one of TLW’s favourite authors!

All welcome!

If you’d like to join us, please email: transatlantic.women@gmail.com and we’ll send you a secure Zoom link in the week of the event.
We hope to see you there!
Team TLW: Laura, Chiara, Lindsay
#TeawithTLW

https://transatlanticladies.wordpress.com/2021/01/20/february-tea-with-tlw-dr-emily-orlando-on-the-decoration-of-houses/

EWS Business: Vote on Amendments to the EWS Constitution by February 7

Dear EWS Members,
I’d like to ask you to vote on two amendments to the EWS Constitution. The first is from the Executive Board proposing that the annual Board meeting, in the past held in person at the MLA convention, in the future be held in a virtual format such as Zoom. Please see the attached proposal for further details.

The second amendment is from Melanie and me, originally drafted in 2019, to create the position of Society Archivist. Due to an error or oversight no longer in anyone’s memory, this was not voted on in 2019. I would appreciate your vote now, particularly since we have already filled the position and Carole Shaffer-Koros has already located items of interest related to EWS history. This full proposal is also attached.


Please use this link to vote by Sunday, February 7, end of the day (wherever you are):
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/28JZDSX

Please let me know if you have any questions. Best wishes to all. Hopefully we see some light at the end of COVID, but I know hard times are still here for many.
Best,

Jennifer

Dr. Jennifer Haytock

President, Edith Wharton Society

EWS Officers, 2021-2023

A complete list of officers from previous years is available under Membership – Officers and Executive Board

2021-23

President: Jennifer Haytock,  jhaytock@brockport.eduSUNY Brockport

Immediate Past President: Melanie Dawsonmvdaws@wm.edu  William & Mary

Vice President: Myrto Drizoumyrto.drizou@boun.edu.trBoğaziçi University

Secretary: Jay Jessee, mjjessee@uab.edu  University of Alabama at Birmingham

Treasurer: Sharon Kim, skim@judsonu.edu Judson University

Editor of the Edith Wharton Review: Paul Ohler,paul.ohler@kpu.caKwantlen Polytechnic University

Webmaster: Donna Campbell, campbelld@wsu.edu Washington State University(Ex Officio)

Membership Committee: Chair Sheila Liming, sliming@champlain.edu Champlain College 

EWS Archivist: Carole Shaffer-Koros, https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/membership/about/ews-archives/

At-Large Executive Board Members

Laura Rattray, Laura.Rattray@glasgow.ac.uk University of Glasgow

Virginia Ricard, Virginia.Ricard@u-bordeaux-montaigne.fr  Bordeaux Montaigne University

Meg Toth, margaret.toth@manhattan.edu Manhattan College 

Wharton in the News: From Sarah Whitehead, a previously unpublished story by Edith Wharton

From Sarah Whitehead, whose publication of a previously unpublished Edith Wharton story in The Atlantic was noted earlier this week.

Sarah Whitehead in the Times Literary Supplement:  “A joy glimpsed” 

Introducing an unpublished story by Edith Wharton 

Raised as an Episcopalian and later influenced by Calvinist thinking, Edith Wharton was drawn towards Roman Catholicism in the final years of her life. While she never converted, biographers have noted her growing attraction to the Catholic faith at this time; in the 1930s she attended masses on her two visits to Rome, and, at home in France, supported the work of the local curé as well as setting up an appeal in aid of the Abbé Comptour’s work in the Parisian suburb of Lutèce. In her fiction, the Catholic church, and Catholic priests in particular, make regular appearances, but these are often uncomfortable ones.  

…. 

“The Children’s Hour”, which has remained unpublished until now, charts an afternoon in the life of a Catholic priest. It is a noteworthy exception to these generally negative, or at least suspicious renderings of the Catholic church and its clergy. Indeed, while there is a touch of the customary unrewarded sacrifice and a sense of missed opportunities found in Wharton’s fiction, this story celebrates the comfort found in the faith and a joyous glimpse of the afterlife on offer to the poverty-stricken Catholic immigrants of New York and their Irish priest.