CFP: Edith Wharton at MLA 2021 (Deadline March 15, 2020)

Edith Wharton Society Call for Papers

Modern Language Association
Toronto, 7–10 January 2021

Edith Wharton’s Masculinities: Beyond the Unsatisfactory Man

In 1991, David Holbrook identified the “unsatisfactory man” in Wharton’s oeuvre. While that assessment remains largely uncontested, the EWS invites presentations on men in Wharton’s work—both fiction and non-fiction—that probes and complicates her treatment of masculinity, including gender normativity and gender fluidity. Any theoretical or contextual approaches welcome.

Please submit titled proposals (approx. 350 words) and a brief CV by March 15, 2020 to Jennifer Haytock at jhaytock@brockport.edu. Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference.

 

Edith Wharton materials at Princeton digitized

From Mary Chinery via the wharton-l listserv:

Wharton scholars might be interested in newly available digitized archival materials in Princeton University’s Firestone Library. A significant trove of Wharton letters and other manuscripts and business papers have been posted online. Individual pages can be downloaded as .tiffs or the entire file as a .pdf (which requires less computer space). Happy Reading!

Here’s a link to the results from a general search in Finding Aids site for Edith Wharton. Click online materials on the left.

https://findingaids.princeton.edu/?v1=Edith+Wharton&f1=kw&b1=AND&v2=&f2=kw&b2=AND&v3=&f3=kw&year=before&ed=&ld=&rpp=10&start=0

See you in New York!

 

Mary Chinery, Georgian Court University

In Memoriam: Helen Killoran (1941-2020)

The EWS has received word of the passing of Helen Killoran, a longtime EWS member and associate professor of English at Ohio University-Lancaster. Dr. Killoran was the author of Edith Wharton: Art and Allusion (1996), The Critical Reception of Edith Wharton, and other work.

Obituary for Helen Killoran: Helen_obit[1]

A tribute page is available at the link.

https://www.mccombwagner.com/obituaries/Helen-Killoran/#!/Obituary

Wharton in the News: EW’s copy of The Age of Innocence returns to The Mount

Edith Wharton kept restlessly editing her best sellers even through numerous print runs. In 1921, she finished fine tuning “The Age of Innocence” upon its sixth printing and tucked one edition onto the shelves at her chateau in Southeastern France.

That copy, with her signature and bookplate, has resurfaced in time for the centennial of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel. It has been donated to the library at another of her palatial homes, the Mount, a museum in Lenox, Mass.

This is the only known English-language version of “The Age of Innocence” that belonged to Wharton, said Susan Wissler, executive director of the museum. (Examples of the writer’s copies of many of her works are already at the Mount; gaps include her collected teenage poems.) Ms. Wissler added that the museum’s book collection, as it grows, powerfully evokes Wharton’s interests and presence: “The library very much provides us with her soul.”

“She was bad . . . always.” Old New York (1924) now Public Domain!

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Photo courtesy Wikimedia.

“She was bad . . . always. They used to meet at the Fifth Avenue Hotel.”

–Edith Wharton, New Year’s Day, 1924

As of today, January 1, 2020, Wharton’s quartet of novellas Old New York is in the public domain. To celebrate this, here’s New Year’s Day (the Seventies), courtesy of Project Gutenberg Australia.

Here are PG Australia’s texts of the novellas:

The Spark, False Dawn, New Year’s Day, The Old Maid

Links to the other novels and novellas available online are being updated today and are available here: https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/works/novels-and-novellas/
NEW YEAR’S DAY
(The ‘Seventies)

I

“She was BAD…always. They used to meet at the Fifth Avenue
Hotel,” said my mother, as if the scene of the offence added to the
guilt of the couple whose past she was revealing. Her spectacles
slanted on her knitting, she dropped the words in a hiss that might
have singed the snowy baby-blanket which engaged her indefatigable
fingers. (It was typical of my mother to be always employed in
benevolent actions while she uttered uncharitable words.)

[read the rest at the link]

Edith Wharton in the News: Pen Craig Gatehouse Condo for sale

Dear EWS members,

Although we usually don’t post items for sale at the EWS site or on this listserv, it’s not every day that a piece of Edith Wharton’s original childhood home comes on the market.  The information is below, if you’re interested.

Name: Joanne Morlan

Email: joanne.morlan@yahoo.com

Website: https://www.rimonthly.com/house-lust-pen-craig-gatehouse/

Comment: Hi Donna, my husband and I live in Newport RI and are selling our condo. Our condo is located at Pen Craig — the childhood home of Edith Wharton. The Gatehouse (where the condo is located) is the last remaining element of the original Wharton estate. RI Monthly magazine just issued the attached article on our condo (see website reference above) which includes quite a bit Edith Wharton background information. I thought your members might be interested in this, and of course we would love to sell Pen Craig to an Edith Wharton admirer! I hope you will consider posting this link! Please let me know if I can provide more information to you on this! Thank you!