Author Archives: Donna Campbell

About Donna Campbell

Professor of English, Washington State University. Late nineteenth- and early 20th-century Americanist and digital humanities. http://www.wsu.edu/~campbelld/ and http://www.donnamcampbell.wordpress.com

Edith Wharton in the News: Week of December 2, 2016

From Antiques and the Arts, http://www.antiquesandthearts.com/william-merritt-chase/

William Merritt Chase

PUBLISHED: NOVEMBER 29, 2016

In 1891, Chase established a studio in Shinnecock, Long Island, N.Y., and founded a summer art school there. This scene of his family poring over a portfolio of Japanese prints shows how work and play intertwined for the artist. “Hall at Shinnecock,” 1892. Pastel on canvas. Terra Foundation for American Art, Daniel J. Terra Collection.

By Jessica Skwire Routhier

BOSTON, MASS. — William Merritt Chase is remembered today not only as one of the great artists of his generation, but also as a gifted and engaging teacher, inspiring a generation of artists who would go on to establish America as an epicenter of Modernism in the Twentieth Century. As such, he is an essential bridge between that Modern era and the time when American art was still in its infancy. His career also encompasses a time of great change in American culture, best seen in his elegantly rendered, intellectually challenging and attention-getting portraits of women. Such portraits are a highlight of “William Merritt Chase,” organized by the Phillips Collection, Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts (MFA), the Fondazione Musei Civici di Venezia and the Terra Foundation for American Art, and on view at the MFA through January 16.

In Edith Wharton’s 1905 novel The House of Mirth, published while Chase was in the autumn of his career, a pivotal scene has the heroine, Lily Bart, participating in a tableau vivant. The term refers to a popular pastime of the turn of the century, in which participants posed in elaborate costumes and settings as living recreations of famous works of art. Lily, whose social standing is in jeopardy but whose beauty remains unrivaled, recreates a portrait by Joshua Reynolds, and Wharton’s elegant prose draws the reader into unguarded admiration. The scene is swathed in poetry and romance until its denouement, when Wharton’s omniscient narrator reveals the ugly way in which certain men in the audience have chosen to view her performance.

William Merritt Chase was also fond of tableaux vivants. In “Old Masters Meet New Women,” her insightful essay for the exhibition catalog, MFA curator Erica E. Hirshler writes that Chase used his studios in New York City and Long Island, N.Y., to stage recreations of paintings by the Old Masters he revered. As a rule, he did not literally depict such entertainments in his paintings and pastels, but a sense of theatricality is nevertheless strong throughout his body of work. His famed 10th Street Studio in New York City was a particularly theatrical place, a frequent setting for his painted portraits and interiors. Diane Paulus of the American Repertory Theater, who provides commentary for the MFA’s mobile guide, notes that Chase’s interiors are arranged like stage sets in order to highlight particular passages or moments of action.

[read the rest at the link above]

 

From the New York Times Book Review:

Consider, for example, the Dows clan of OUR TIME AT FOXHOLLOW FARM: A Hudson Valley Family Remembered (Excelsior/State University of New York, $50) and the 800-acre Rhinebeck estate they intended to be “a sort of Mount Vernon on the Hudson.” The patriarch, Tracy Dows, was an avid amateur photographer, and David Byars’s book is based on the 26 private albums, dating from 1903 to the 1930s, that Dows’s daughter donated to Hudson River Heritage. There are plenty of views of the pillared mansion and its outbuildings (including the guesthouse where Thomas Wolfe wrote “Look Homeward, Angel”) as well as the elaborate spreads of pals like the Astors, who had a vaulted, Corinthian-columned indoor swimming pool, and the Dinsmores, whose guests could play golf on their nine-hole course. The text is filled with the era’s boldface names — Edith Wharton, Charles Dana Gibson, the Olmsted brothers, Alice Roosevelt Longworth — and the family’s travels took them to the era’s favorite high-end locales: the “cottages” of Newport; the exclusive resorts of Hot Springs, Va., and Jekyll Island, Ga.; the Beatrix-Farrand-designed gardens of Seal Harbor, Me. But in between the lines of the captions are stories waiting to be told.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/01/books/review/country-living-our-time-at-foxhollow-farm-david-byars.html

From Laura Rattray: Custom of the Country Competition

If you’re reading The Custom of the Country with your students this session and think they might be interested in the Glasgow competition/challenge, please point them in this direction:

https://www.facebook.com/transatlanticladies/

It’s not just for students though – open to all!

All best- Laura

Dr. Laura Rattray

Reader in American Literature

School of Critical Studies

University of Glasgow

4 University Gardens

Glasgow G12 8QQ

 

Email: Laura.Rattray@glasgow.ac.uk

http://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/critical/staff/laurarattray/

New Books: Edith Wharton’s Travel Writings (published in Spain)

del-viaje-como-arte-portada

I am writing with regard to an anthology of Edith Wharton’s travel narratives I have recently published in Spain, in translated version. I was wondering if you would be interested in including it in the Edith Wharton Society webpage. I enclose a photo of the volume and the link to the publication. In the section entitled “Reseñas” (Reviews) you can see the vivid interest that Edith Wharton elicits in this part of the world!

http://lalineadelhorizonte.com/editorial/121-del-viaje-como-arte-9788415958437.html 

Teresa Gómez Reus

Edith Wharton Review

Dear members of the Edith Wharton Society,

As a benefit of membership, society members receive a print and online subscription to the Edith Wharton Review.  When each issue is published, JSTOR sends an eTOC with information about accessing your electronic subscriptions. Penn State UP is setting this up, using the e-mail addresses of the members (perhaps you have already received an e-mail with your electronic subscription information). If you are not interested in receiving an eTOC, please let me know (mdrizou@valdosta.edu) by October 28, 2016. Please know that e-mails will not be used for any marketing or advertising purposes, and if a member decides the eTOC is not useful, he/she can easily unsubscribe at any time.

 Thank you as always for your support to the Society,

 

All best wishes,

 

Myrto

Myrto Drizou, PhD

Assistant Professor of English

Book Review Editor, The Edith Wharton Review

Membership Coordinator, The Edith Wharton Society

Valdosta State University

West Hall 226

Valdosta, GA 31698

mdrizou@valdosta.edu

CFP: Critical Insights on Edith Wharton (11.20.16)

Call for Papers
Critical Insights:  Edith Wharton

Please see below the call for essays for a forthcoming volume on Edith Wharton. The volume is part of the series Critical Insights (Salem Press) and will appear in fall 2017. More information can be found here:

http://www.salempress.com/critical_insights.html

Following the guidelines for the series, I seek essays (4000-5000 words) that are accessible to high school students and undergraduates, and are meant to:

  • Provide undergraduates with a comprehensive introduction to the author’s works, as well as the various approaches students are likely to encounter and study in their classrooms.
  • Help students build a foundation for studying works in greater depth by introducing them to key concepts, contexts, critical approaches, and vocabulary in literary scholarship.

The format of each volume is standard, and will include:

  • A “biographical” essay (2000 words) that gives an overview of Wharton’s life
  • A “historical background” essay (4000-5000 words) that addresses how the time period influenced Wharton as well as what makes her work relevant to a modern audience. The essay should consider a variety of contexts in which Wharton’s work is usually placed.
  • A “critical reception” essay (4000-5000 words) that reviews the history of critical responses to Wharton’s oeuvre, and addresses the major concerns that scholars have identified over the years. The essay should be a comprehensive overview of criticism rather than a focused analysis of specific perspectives.
  • A “critical lens” essay (4000-5000 words) that offers a close reading of Wharton’s work(s) from a particular critical standpoint (e.g. gender studies, cultural studies, disability studies, etc).
  • A “comparative analysis” essay (4000-5000 words) that analyzes Wharton in the light of another (similar or contemporary) author.

In addition: the volume will include ten 5000-word essays, which will offer various critical readings of Wharton’s work. Topics could address (but are not limited to):

  • Wharton and the First World War; Wharton and race; Wharton and feminism; queer readings of Wharton’s works; Wharton and cosmopolitanism; Wharton and modernism; Wharton as an architectural historian; Wharton’s works in comparison with other writers (American or not); Wharton in a transatlantic context; Wharton and animal studies; Wharton and disability; Wharton and other genres (e.g. Gothic); Wharton in film; Wharton as a travel writer, etc.
  • I welcome topics that reflect the main critical approaches to Wharton’s oeuvre, as well as recent reevaluations of her work. Essays that incorporate a range of Wharton’s texts are strongly encouraged. Readings and approaches should not be dated nor so cutting-edge as to be dated in the next 10 years.

Please send an abstract (500-1000 words) and a brief CV by November 20, 2016 to:

 

Myrto Drizou, PhD

Department of English

Valdosta State University

Valdosta GA 31698

mdrizou@valdosta.edu

 

Notification of acceptance by December 15, 2016. Complete first drafts (5000 words) due by March 15, 2017.

CFP: Wharton Panel at ALA 2017 (Deadline 1.15.17)

Wharton Chapters

Wharton’s works are increasingly making their ways into a range of scholarly projects that extend beyond studies of a single author.  For scholars who are focusing on projects that involve a range of writers and/or readers interested in Wharton’s role in book projects, how is Wharton’s work part of a broader conversation?  What approaches to Wharton’s writing are these projects privileging or producing?  How might they contribute to or challenge existing studies of Wharton’s work?  Finally, what might these projects suggest to us about the present and future of Wharton studies in the academy?  Please send 250 – 300 word proposals to Melanie Dawson at mvdaws@wm.edu no later than January 15.  

Melanie Dawson

David and Carolyn Wakefield Term Distinguished Associate Professor of English

Director of English Honors

Department of English

College of William and Mary