Author Archives: Donna Campbell

About Donna Campbell

Professor of English, Washington State University. Late nineteenth- and early 20th-century Americanist and digital humanities. http://www.wsu.edu/~campbelld/ and http://www.donnamcampbell.wordpress.com

New Articles May 2016

2016

Drizou, Myrto. “The Undecidable Miss Bart: Edith Wharton’s Naturalism in _The House of Mirth_.” _49th Parallel: An Interdisciplinary Journal of North American Studies_ 38 (Spring 2016): 21-49. Web.

Gould, Rebecca. “Vested Reading: Writing the Self through Ethan Frome,” Life Writing 13.4 (2016). The PDF is attached and it can be linked to here: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/14484528.2015.1124742?journalCode=rlwr20.

2015

Baltrum, James. “The Benedick, Bachelorhood, and Edith Wharton’s Classified (Re)Invention of the Heterosexual Male in the House of Mirth.” Explicator 73.4 (2015): 290-95. Print.

Bannett, Nina. “Reclaiming Sentimentalism in Edith Wharton’s Summer.” Edith Wharton Review 31.1-2 (2015): 29-56. Print.

Beer, Janet, and Avril Horner. “‘The Great Panorama’: Edith Wharton as Historical Novelist.” Modern Language Review 110.1 (2015): 69-84, 313. Print.

Boyle, Elizabeth A. “‘Becoming a Part of Her Innermost Being’: Gender, Mass-Production, and the Evolution of Department Store Culture in Edith Wharton’s ‘Bunner Sisters’.” American Literary Realism 47.3 (2015): 203-18. Print.

Burden, Robert. Travel, Modernism and Modernity. Farnham, England: Ashgate, 2015. Print.

Campbell, Donna. The Edith Wharton Society. Edith Wharton Society, 2015. Print.

Crowley, John W. “Old New York’s Twin Rediscovered.” American Literary Realism 48.1 (2015): 79-83. Print.

Girling, Anna. “The Touch of a Vanished Hand: Edith Wharton’s Fraught Relationship with John Murray.” TLS: The Times Literary Supplement 5856 (2015): 13-15. Print.

—. “‘Agrope among Alien Forces’: Alchemical Transformations and Capitalist Transactions in Edith Wharton’s the Touchstone.” Edith Wharton Review 31.1-2 (2015): 74-87. Print.

Halpern, Ira. “Secret Love, Private Space, and Inner Sanctuary: The Concealed in the Age of Innocence.” Explicator 73.2 (2015): 133-36. Print.

Liming, Sheila. “A Month at the Mount.” Edith Wharton Review 31.1-2 (2015): 88-92. Print.

—. “Suffer the Little Vixens: Sex and Realist Terror in ‘Jazz Age’ America.” Journal of Modern Literature 38.3 (2015): 99-118. Print.

McParland, Robert. Beyond Gatsby: How Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and Writers of the 1920s Shaped American Culture. Contemporary American Literature (Contemporary American Literature). Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015. Print.

Mendelman, Lisa. “Ambivalence and Irony: Gendered Forms in Interwar America.” Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, and Theory 71.4 (2015): 23-52. Print.

Navarro, Lauren Christie. Foodways and Gender Relations in the American Naturalist Novel. 2015. Print.

Noe, Marcia, and Jeffrey Melnik. “Edith Wharton’s Invitation to Moral Awareness and Careful Reading in ‘the Other Two’.” Eureka Studies in Teaching Short Fiction 11-12 (2015): 53-59. Print.

Ohler, Paul. “Digital Resources and the Magazine Context of Edith Wharton’s Short Stories.” Edith Wharton Review 31.1-2 (2015): 57-73. Print.

Orlando, Emily J. “Edith Wharton and the New Narcissism.” Women’s Studies: An Interdisciplinary Journal 44.6 (2015): 729-52. Print.

—. “Irreverent Intimacy: Nella Larsen’s Revisions of Edith Wharton.” Twentieth Century Literature 61.1 (2015): 32-62. Print.

Port, Cynthia. “Celebrity and the Epistolary Afterlife in Edith Wharton’s Early Fiction.” Edith Wharton Review 31.1-2 (2015): 3-28. Print.

Romagnolo, Catherine. Opening Acts: Narrative Beginnings in Twentieth-Century Feminist Fiction. Frontiers of Narrative (Frontiers of Narrative). Lincoln, NE: U of Nebraska P, 2015. Print.

Sakane, Takahiro. “‘A Turmoil of Contradictory Feelings’: Money, Women, and Body in Edith Wharton’s the Age of Innocence.” Textual Practice 29.1 (2015): 71-89. Print.

Shumaker, Scott. “The House of Mirth and the Desert of the Real: Edith Wharton and Hyperreality.” Explicator 73.4 (2015): 316-19. Print.

Totten, Gary. “Wharton’s Wild West: Undine Spragg and Dakota Divorce Culture: Beinecke Research Report.” Edith Wharton Review 31.1-2 (2015): 93-96. Print.

Towheed, Shafquat. “Reading the Great War: An Examination of Edith Wharton’s Reading and Responses, 1914-1918.” New Directions in Book History (New Directions in Book History). Eds. Towheed, Shafquat and Edmund G. C. King. Basingstoke, England: Palgrave Macmillan, 2015. xi, 266 pp. Print.

 

Wharton in the News: ‘The Members Have Been Gagged’ at NY Times

05Insider-Wharton-1-master675At the New York Times:

Edith Wharton loved animals.

But she hated John P. Haines, the president of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. Mrs. Wharton and other members of the society believed that Mr. Haines was at least inept, if not corrupt, in his management of the agency.

After an especially stormy meeting on Feb. 15, 1906 — a meeting so charged that it was front-page news in The New York Times — Mrs. Wharton took pen in hand at her townhouse on Park Avenue and East 78th Street.

 

Academy Award-winning screenwriter Christopher Hampton to speak at Wharton in Washington

Academy Award-winning screenwriter Christopher Hampton to speak at Wharton in Washington 2016

Dear EWS Members,

As you know, the Edith Wharton in Washington conference is fast approaching. The conference organizers, Melanie Dawson and Jennifer Haytock, have been working very hard over many months to make this gathering an exceptional experience for attendees.

They have recently secured a commitment from Christopher Hampton to give a talk one night of the conference. Mr. Hampton is the Academy-Award winning screenwriter of Dangerous Liaisons and was nominated for Atonement, and he is currently working on an adaptation of Wharton’s Custom of the Country. We are very excited about this opportunity to hear from him.

While Mr. Hampton has graciously offered to waive his speaking fee, the conference still needs to provide a business-class plane ticket from London, two nights at our conference hotel, and car service. Because his commitment has come so late, we’re doing some last-minute fundraising.

I’m writing to ask those who wish to contribute to the fundraising effort to click on the PayPal link in this message and donate as soon as possible. To make things interesting, I will enter each person who makes a donation into a draw. The prize is a copy of the first edition of Madame de Treymes printed by the Merrymount Press with illustrations by Alonzo Kimball.

The donations are tax-deductible. Donors’ names will be listed in the conference program.

See you in Washington,Paul

Christopher Hampton $25 Donation Donate Button with Credit Cards

Christopher Hampton $50 Donation Donate Button with Credit Cards

Christopher Hampton $100 Donation Donate Button with Credit Cards

Christopher Hampton $250 Donation Donate Button with Credit Cards

Christopher Hampton $500 Donation Donate Button with Credit Cards

Membership Directory Updated April 7, 2016

The Membership Directory has been updated. You can check your membership status by clicking on Membership -> Directory or this link:

https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/membership/directory/
Thanks to Myrto Drizou, Membership Committee Chair, for providing this list and for letting members know that “Members whose registration ends with issue 32.1 (May/June 2016) should be fine for the conference.” 

EWS Member Irene Goldman-Price to Speak at The Mount

Irene.jpgEWS Member Irene Goldman-Price to Speak at The Mount

ART AND STORY IN EDITH WHARTON’S POETRY

Thursday, April 14, 4:00 pm
Free

Wharton scholar Dr. Irene Goldman-Price will give an illustrated talk on Wharton’s poetry (half of which remains unpublished) and the art that moved her.

From http://www.edithwharton.org/event/art-and-story-in-edith-whartons-poetry/?instance_id=15916

Edith Wharton wrote approximately two hundred poems in her lifetime, nearly half of which remain unpublished. She was also a connoisseur of fine art and found poetic inspiration in paintings, sculpture, and architecture. Join us on Thursday, April 14th, when scholar Dr. Irene Goldman-Price will give an illustrated talk on Wharton’s poetry and the art that moved her.

Dr. Irene Goldman-Price earned a PhD in English at Boston University and spent much of her career teaching English and Women’s Studies at Ball State University. She is the editor of My Dear Governess: The Letters of Edith Wharton to Anna Bahlmann (Yale UP 2012) and is currently preparing an edition of Wharton’s poetry as part of the Complete Works of Edith Wharton for Oxford University Press.  She serves on the editorial board of the Edith Wharton Review and as a trustee at The Mount.

March 2016 Comments and Queries

The FOS Foundation recently posted the following:

“Just a few short months away from the release of our first documentary film 100 Years of the Pulitzer. Here is Helen Mirren for the Pulitzer prize film. Helen read a number of prize-winning works. It was a delight to see her read on the stage!”

They link to a very short clip of Helen Mirren reading from Wharton’s _The Age of Innocence_ for the upcoming documentary here:

–Dan Hefko

—-

Name: Shawnie Kelley
Email: shawnie@wanderlusttravelpress.com
Website: http://www.wanderlust-tours.com
Where would you like this to appear? : New Books
Comment: My name is Shawnie Kelley and I am a published author finishing my current book titled, “Woman’s Guide to France” (Wanderlust Travel Press, 2016).  I am hoping to get my hands on an image of Edith Wharton to illustrate a short entry that features some of the more famous ladies who made an impact on French literary society. Hoping you can help me out as we are in the final thralls of editorial and gathering images.

My “Woman’s Guide to France” is a sweeping, femme-focused journey the country. The region-by-region exploration of France as seen through a feminine lens goes from romantic to rowdy, pious to profane, and sexy to sublime, proving the allure of France for women goes well beyond the pursuits of food, fashion and romance.

Please contact me via email or call me at 614-546-8118 if you have any questions.  Thanks so much!

Merci beaucoup,
Shawnie