Category Archives: CFP

From Ferda Asya: Contribute to a Modern Language Association (MLA) Approaches Volume on Teaching Edith Wharton’s Works

Contribute to a Modern Language Association (MLA) Approaches Volume on Teaching Edith Wharton’s Works

The volume Approaches to Teaching the Works of Edith Wharton, edited by Ferdâ Asya (Professor of English,111A Bakeless Center for the Humanities, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, 400 East Second Street, Bloomsburg, PA 17815; fasya@bloomu.edu), is now in development in the MLA series Approaches to Teaching World Literature.

You can contribute to the volume by completing a survey about your experiences of teaching Wharton’s works.

You also can propose an essay for the volume. Information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey.

The survey for Approaches to Teaching the Works of Edith Wharton is also available here:https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/att-Wharton

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CFP: Edith Wharton Panel at ALA 2018

For The American Literature Association Association Conference

May 24-7 2018, San Francisco, CA

Wharton and the West

We invite proposals for papers that explore variations on the idea of the West in Wharton’s work.  Both the West and the Midwest are referenced in Wharton’s work in relation to cultural formations, types of characters, and cultures that appear distinct from the urban Northeast featured in many of the author’s works.  In addition, Western writers came into fashion during Wharton’s era, including any number of writers about California, exploration, about the changing landscape of the heartland through the West coast.   How might Wharton’s work register the presence and popularity of Western writers (Bret Harte, Frank Norris, or Gertrude Atherton, for example)?   How might we consider Wharton’s familiarity with the people of the west, broadly conceived?  How might the presence of Western writing or Western narratives leave traces in Wharton’s oeuvre?  Send 200 word a proposals and curriculum vita to mvdaws@wm.edu by Jan 15.

Melanie Dawson

David and Carolyn Wakefield Term Distinguished Associate Professor of English

Director of English Honors

Department of English
College of William and Mary

Edith Wharton Review: Call for Submissions for Special Issues

New Deadlines

The Edith Wharton Review invites submissions for three upcoming Special Issues.

Edith Wharton and Religion

We invite papers exploring any aspect of religion, spirituality, and the sacred in Wharton’s work. Essays should be 4,000-6,000 words in length, but longer essays of no more than 8,000 words will also be considered. Submissions should be made online to The Edith Wharton Review with a note that the piece is for the “Wharton and Religion” Special Issue. Inquiries: contact Sharon Kim, skim@judsonu.edu.

Deadline: August 15, 2017

Edith Wharton and the Periodical Market

Essays should be 4,000-6,000 words in length, but longer essays of no more than 8,000 words will also be considered. Submissions should be made online to The Edith Wharton Review with a note that the piece is for the “Wharton and the Periodical Market” Special Issue. Inquiries: contact Paul Ohler, paul.ohler@kpu.ca

Deadline: May 30, 2018

The Age of Innocence Centenary

Deadline TBA: late 2019, early 2020

Inquiries: Sharon Kim or Paul Ohler

CFP: Edith Wharton panel at SAMLA (Deadline: 6.1.17)

SAMLA 2017 CFP

The Edith Wharton Society is expanding and extending the call for proposals for the South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference (SAMLA 89) to be held in Atlanta, Georgia, November 3-5, 2017.  The Society is widening its call for papers to any aspect of Wharton studies. The conference topic is High Art / Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture, so papers related to this topic will be welcome but not required.  Please submit a 300-500 word abstract and one page CV as email attachments to Mary Carney at mary.carney@ung.edu on or before Thursday, June 1, 2017.

 

 

CFP: Edith Wharton panels at SAMLA

FROM TABLEUX VIVANT TO FLASH MOB: CULTURAL CONTINUUMS FROM EDITH WHARTON TO SPENCER TUNICK

 

The Edith Wharton Society invites proposals for a panel at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference (SAMLA 89) to be held in Atlanta, Georgia, November 3-5, 2017.  The conference topic is High Art / Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture. 

Edith Wharton produced a range of cultural products, including canonical novels and short stories, fund-raising anthologies for wartime France, guides to interior design, and travel books. Current popular culture suggests a continuing interest in Wharton, her writings, and those decades that are the focus of her work. Julian Fellows, creator of Downton Abbey, admits that “It is quite true that Edith Wharton has been a tremendous influence on me. . . . I decided, largely because of her work, that it was time I wrote something.” On Wharton’s 150th birthday, Vogue magazine offered an 18-pages to celebrate, including photos by Annie Leibovitz. The Gossip Girl series draws on Whartonian inspiration.  What has driven the renewed attention being paid to the Edwardian and WWI eras in contemporary pop culture?

The Wharton society invites papers that explore a broad range of responses to how Wharton’s art contributes to a continuum of cultural inquiry and commentary that persists to this day in high / low cultural expressions. One might consider such topics as how modern flash mobs reflect or rewrite the tableau vivants of The House of Mirth. How do Wharton’s texts and practices reflect a generational difference (or not) in attitudes toward privacy in (social) media?  How might contemporary short forms or serializations (blog posts, film and music reviews, opinion pieces, etc.) draw on the form and content of her essays, cultural commentaries, letters, or short stories? Does Wharton’s art bear narrative, formal, or thematic similarities to other forms of popular culture, such as soap operas or online TV dramas? Wharton’s travel writing about excursions via automobile might be compared to modern travel blogs, television programming, or websites.  We hope to receive a range of submissions to create lively, even surprising, insights and conversation.

Please submit a 300-500 word abstract, one page CV, and AV requirements via email to Mary Carney, University of North Georgia, at mary.carney@ung.edu by May 12, 2017. 

CFP: SHARP/ Edith Wharton Society at MLA 2018) (Deadline: 3.10.17)

Call for papers – SHARP/ Edith Wharton Society

Session type: Joint Session / Affiliate Organizations

Organizations: Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing; Edith Wharton Society

Title of the session: Edith Wharton, Book History and Digital Humanities

Submission requirements: Abstract, 300 words

Deadline for submissions: 10 March 2017

Contact person information: Lise Jaillant (l.jaillant@lboro.ac.uk) OR Paul Ohler (Paul.Ohler@kpu.ca)

 

Book historians have long been interested in Edith Wharton’s transition from “lady to author.” In the late 1950s, Millicent Bell examined the archive of the publisher Charles Scribner to understand Wharton’s growing professionalism and awareness of the market value of her work. With the transatlantic, and transnational turn in book history, scholars have paid attention to the way Wharton managed her career on both sides of the Atlantic, skillfully negotiating rights from book, film and drama sources. “Like other canny literary operators sensitive to the potential of new media outlets for their literary material,” wrote David Finkelstein, “Wharton extracted maximum exposure and financial benefit from appearances in multiple media forms.” This remediation from print to new media is of course of interest to digital humanists, who have brought innovative perspectives to Wharton studies. Another avenue of inquiry has been opened with the digitalization of early-twentieth-century periodicals and the study of the various forms in which Wharton’s texts appeared.

 

This session will showcase new approaches in book history and digital humanities to shed light on Edith Wharton’s work and relationship with her publishers and readers. It will bring together “traditional” and digital humanists to illuminate Wharton’s global career and reception of her work across borders. It will also identify future lines of inquiries and innovative methodologies that will help us better understand one of the most important writers of the early twentieth century. 

 

Paul Ohler Ph.D.

Department of English

Kwantlen Polytechnic University

12666-72nd Avenue

Surrey, British Columbia

V3W 2M8

Canada

President, Edith Wharton Society

Associate Editor, Edith Wharton Review

CFP: EWS Panel at MLA 2018 (deadline 3.15.17)

Edith Wharton Society CFP MLA 2018:  Edith Wharton’s New York

In her memoir, A Backward Glance (1934) Wharton wrote that the New York of her youth was “as much a vanished city . . . as the lowest layer of Schliemann’s Troy.” In her 1899 story “A Cup of Cold Water” the protagonist walks the city on a winter night, moving down Fifth Avenue to Thirty-Fifth Street before he turns east toward Broadway’s middle-class precincts. The story heralds Wharton’s use of New York as a setting for many of her best-known works of fiction. We invite papers that consider the relevance of New York to her depictions, early and late, of urban geography and architecture, social and ethnic diversity, capitalism and cultural entropy, and the “vanished city” of her youth, among other approaches. Proposals might address stories such as “The Other Two” (1904), the novellas of Old New York (1924), and novels such as The House of Mirth (1905), The Custom of the Country (1913), The Age of Innocence (1920), The Mother’s Recompense (1925), and Twilight Sleep (1927). Also welcome are comparative analyses with alternative visions of New York by writers such as Abraham Cahan, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Henry James.

Session type: Allied Organization

Submission requirements: Abstract (300 words) and short CV

Deadline for submissions: 15 March 2017

Contact information: Paul Ohler (paul.ohler@kpu.ca)