Category Archives: CFP

CFP Updated and Deadline Extended: The Nonhuman in American Literary Naturalism (Deadline February 17, 2021)

UPDATED AND DEADLINE EXTENDED: 

Call for proposals  

The Nonhuman in American Literary Naturalism 

Editors: Kenneth K Brandt and Karin M Danielsson 

At the end of the 19th century, American authors such as Stephen Crane, Frank Norris, Theodore Dreiser, and Jack London were influenced by new advances in science—notably the idea of evolution. Nature and the nonhuman were crucial for these writers, whom scholars   most often group under the rubric of American literary naturalists. Traditional scholarship on American literary naturalism has closely attended to various environmental pressures in urban and wilderness settings, but scholars have paid much less attention to the naturalists’ investigations into the nonhuman, such as animals, plants, landscapes, houses, or weather. To extend and deepen our understanding of this under-researched field, we propose a volume of essays that offers a wide variety of innovative critical approaches to the nonhuman in American naturalist literature. We welcome studies based in ecocriticism, animal studies, new materialism, narrative theory, or ethics. We are receptive to essay proposals focused on the core naturalists from around 1900 as well as more contemporary writers in the naturalist tradition. Proposals may focus on authors including Crane, Norris, London, Wharton, Garland, Dreiser, Chopin, Dunbar, Sinclair, Twain, Glasgow, Frederic, Cather, O’Neill, Steinbeck, Wright, Hemingway, Petry, Dos Passos, Larsen, Farrell, Hammett, Cain and others. More recent writers may include Oates, Vonnegut, DeLillo, Morrison, McCarthy, Wilson, Pynchon, and others. The editors are particularly interested in proposals on Larsen, Dreiser, Wright, Twain, Petry, and authors in the SF, cyberpunk, and biopunk traditions.  

Possible topic areas might include but are not limited to: 

  • Animal agency    
  • Anthropomorphism 
  • Nonhuman sentience 
  • Ecology 
  • Ethology 
  • Evolution 
  • Farming 
  • Forests, trees, plants 
  • Houses and other structures 
  • Human–nonhuman intersubjectivity 
  • Landscape and place 
  • Physical or environmental transformations   
  • Posthumanism 
  • Speciesism 
  • Technology’s intersections with the nonhuman 
  • Weather and climate 
  • Wild, feral, and domestic nonhumans 

The Lexington Books Ecocritical Theory and Practice series editor has expressed a strong interest in the project and has requested a full proposal. It is the publisher’s wish that authors or at least one co-author holds a PhD. 

We invite essay proposals of a maximum of 500 words on any topic relating to the nonhuman in American literary naturalism by the deadline of 17 February, 2021. Please include a title, a maximum of five key words, and a brief biography. We aim to reply to respondents by 25 February 2021, and full drafts of essays (5000–8000 words) will be due 1 September 2021. Please send a 500-word maximum proposal and a brief biography to karin.molander.danielsson@mdh.se and kbrandt@scad.edu by 17 February, 2021. 

CFP (new deadline: February 19, 2021): EWS Panels at SSAWW

The Edith Wharton Society invites proposals for a SSAWW roundtable (Baltimore, Nov 4-7, 2021) focused on the conference theme of “Ecologies, Survival, Change.” Proposals may cover any aspect of Wharton’s work, gardening, or environmental, political, or interpersonal contexts. “Ecologies” may also encompass systems and networks beyond the natural world. Please send 150-word proposals and short narrative cv’s to mvdaws@wm.edu by February 19, 2021. 

CFP: Edith Wharton and Work at MLA 2022 (Deadline: March 15, 2021)

Edith Wharton Society Call for Papers 

Modern Language Association 
Washington, DC January 6-9, 2022 

Edith Wharton and Work 

The EWS invites proposals for roundtable presentations (7-8 minutes) on work in relation to Wharton’s writing and life. Presenters might consider issues of class and labor; disability; domestic work; art and the literary market; “works” of art; the value/currencies of work; Wharton as worker; and more. Any theoretical or contextual approaches welcome. 

Please submit titled proposals (approx. 350 words) and a brief CV by March 15, 2021 to Jennifer Haytock at jhaytock@brockport.edu. Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference. 

CFP: Edith Wharton roundtable at SSAWW (deadline January 27, 2021)

The Edith Wharton Society invites proposals for a SSAWW roundtable (Baltimore, Nov 4-7, 2021) focused on the conference theme of “Ecologies, Survival, Change.” Proposals may cover any aspect of Wharton’s work, gardening, or environmental, political, or interpersonal contexts. “Ecologies” may also encompass systems and networks beyond the natural world. Please send 150-word proposals and short narrative cv’s to mvdaws@wm.edu by 1/27. 

Updated CFP (New Deadline: February 15, 2021): Edith Wharton panels at ALA in Boston (July 2021)

Edith Wharton Society Call for Papers

American Literature Association

July 7-11, 2021 Boston, MA

Reading Edith Wharton at Times of Crisis: Precarity, Vulnerability, and Risk

The COVID-19 pandemic has culminated a global state of crisis, deeply defined by the inability to secure a future in either individual or collective terms. As we are grappling with the anxieties of biological, economic, and political survival, we are called to redefine the grounds—and the possibility—of security, permanence, longevity, and tradition. Throughout her work, Wharton has examined such questions across classes, genders, races, ages, and cultures. What do her works teach us about the current “crisis,” and, conversely, how can we re-examine her works in light of a pandemic and the ensuing circumstances of vulnerability and risk? As Judith Butler has argued in Frames of War, the precariousness of life is shared by all but the “precarity” of survival is unequally distributed among those who are most imperiled or disenfranchised.

This panel invites papers that explore how Wharton represents different forms of precarity, vulnerability, and risk throughout her fiction, poetry, drama, as well as non-fiction (e.g. travel writing, letters, essays). Panelists might consider (but are not limited to) the following topics:

  • How does Wharton represent the biopolitics of illness and death?
  • How is precarity inflected by race, ethnicity, gender, ability, and age?
  • What are the intersections of precarity, class, and capitalist risk?
  • Is risk endemic to Wharton’s representation of American culture and how does this contrast with her views on permanence and tradition (especially in an international context)?
  • What narrative forms, tropes, and genres does Wharton choose to register motifs of precarity and risk?
  • How does Wharton represent the precarity of military conflict and colonial regimes?

All theoretical approaches are welcome, and panelists are encouraged to consider more than one of Wharton’s works, if possible. Please submit titled proposals (approx. 350 words) and a brief CV by February 15, 2021 to Myrto Drizou at myrto.drizou@boun.edu.tr. Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference. More details about the format of the conference are to be announced by the American Literature Association in the coming months.

CFP: Edith Wharton Society at ALA in Boston

Edith Wharton Society Call for Papers

American Literature Association

May 27-30, 2021 Boston, MA

Reading Edith Wharton at Times of Crisis: Precarity, Vulnerability, and Risk

The COVID-19 pandemic has culminated a global state of crisis, deeply defined by the inability to secure a future in either individual or collective terms. As we are grappling with the anxieties of biological, economic, and political survival, we are called to redefine the grounds—and the possibility—of security, permanence, longevity, and tradition. Throughout her work, Wharton has examined such questions across classes, genders, races, ages, and cultures. What do her works teach us about the current “crisis,” and, conversely, how can we re-examine her works in light of a pandemic and the ensuing circumstances of vulnerability and risk? As Judith Butler has argued in Frames of War, the precariousness of life is shared by all but the “precarity” of survival is unequally distributed among those who are most imperiled or disenfranchised.

This panel invites papers that explore how Wharton represents different forms of precarity, vulnerability, and risk throughout her fiction, poetry, drama, as well as non-fiction (e.g. travel writing, letters, essays). Panelists might consider (but are not limited to) the following topics:

  • How does Wharton represent the biopolitics of illness and death?
  • How is precarity inflected by race, ethnicity, gender, ability, and age?
  • What are the intersections of precarity, class, and capitalist risk?
  • Is risk endemic to Wharton’s representation of American culture and how does this contrast with her views on permanence and tradition (especially in an international context)?
  • What narrative forms, tropes, and genres does Wharton choose to register motifs of precarity and risk?
  • How does Wharton represent the precarity of military conflict and colonial regimes?

All theoretical approaches are welcome, and panelists are encouraged to consider more than one of Wharton’s works, if possible. Please submit titled proposals (approx. 350 words) and a brief CV by January 15, 2021 to Myrto Drizou at myrto.drizou@boun.edu.tr. Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference. More details about the format of the conference are to be announced by the American Literature Association in the coming months.

2020 EWS Prizes (Deadline: June 30, 2020)

The Edith Wharton Society is delighted to announce three prizes for 2020.  Below please find all calls for submissions.  All submission materials should be sent via email by June 30, 2020 to current EWS President, Melanie Dawson, College of William and Mary, at mvdaws@wm.edu.

The Elsa Nettels Prize for a Beginning Scholar

This award, formerly known as the “Edith Wharton Society Prize for a Beginning Scholar,” established in 2005, recognizes the best unpublished essay on Edith Wharton’s work by a beginning scholar, advanced graduate student, independent scholar, or faculty member who has held a full-time appointment for four or fewer years.  All entries will be considered for publication in The Edition Wharton Review, published by Penn State University Press.  The author of the prize-winning essay will receive an award of $250.

How to apply:

  • Submissions should be 20-30 double-spaced pages long and follow the 8th edition MLA style, using endnotes rather than footnotes.
  • Submissions should include two attached files: an anonymized MS Word version of your paper and a separate cover letter containing the applicant’s name, essay title, academic status, e-mail address, postal address, and the award name.
  • Please use the subject line: “EWS Elsa Nettels Prize for a Beginning Scholar.”
  • Submissions are due to mvdaws@wm.edu by June 30, 2020.

The Edith Wharton Society Award for Archival Research 

The archival award, in the amount of $500, enables a scholar to conduct research at one of the Edith Wharton archives at Wharton’s library at The Mount in Lenox, MA, the Wharton Collection at Yale University’s Beinecke Library, or the Wharton papers at the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas.

Funds must be used for transportation, lodging, and other expenses related to archival research.  Notification of the award will take place by July 30, 2020.  The award can be used between August 1, 2020 and July 30, 2021.  A brief report detailing some aspect(s) of the research (not intended to preempt publication in other scholarly venues) will be due to the EWS president by September 1, 2021 and will be published in the Edith Wharton Review.

How to apply:

  • Submissions should include a proposal (of no more than two single-spaced pages) that describes the applicant’s overarching research project, its contribution to Wharton scholarship, the applicant’s scholarly preparation, and the relevance of the archive to the project’s completion.
  • Also include two additional attachments: a CV and a separate cover letter containing your current affiliation, rank, and mailing address.
  • Please use the subject line: “EWS Award for Archival Research.”
  • Submissions are due to mvdaws@wm.edu by June 30, 2020.

The Edith Wharton Society Undergraduate Research Prize

First offered in 2014, the undergraduate research prize is open to students at all undergraduate levels.  Papers should be no more than fifteen pages long and can address Wharton’s works in any genre.  The winning essay will be published on the EWS website, and the author will receive an award of $100.

How to apply:

  • Please send an anonymized electronic submission as an email attachment in Microsoft word, along with a separate attached cover letter containing your name, essay title, undergraduate institution, the name of your faculty mentor, e-mail address (and perhaps an alternate email, if your email address is about to change), postal address, and the name of the award.
  • Please use the subject line: “EWS Undergraduate Research Prize.”
  • Submissions are due to mvdaws@wm.edu by June 30, 2020.

The Edith Wharton Society sees its commitment to Wharton’s writing as including  financial support for Wharton scholarship, with two awards specifically for beginning scholars.  We thank all in the Wharton society who have donated to these prizes over the years, many of whom have been award recipients; your support of this endeavor enables our generosity.  If you are inclined to donate to support this year’s awards, a donation portal is linked here.

https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/donate/

 

 

CFP: The Age of Innocence at 100

The Age of Innocence at 100

The Edith Wharton Review invites submissions for a Special Issue celebrating the centenary of The Age of Innocence.

We welcome essays on any aspect of Wharton’s acclaimed novel, from the historical to the queer, from the architectural to the gastronomic. We are especially interested in essays that interpret The Age of Innocence in relation to our contemporary historical moment from the perspective of current critical theories, new reading practices, political climates, and global contexts. One hundred years since its publication, the novel remains relevant, and we seek comparative and cross-disciplinary efforts including engagements with age, temporalities, embodiment and dis/ability.

Deadline: August 31, 2020

http://www.psupress.org/journals/jnls_EWR.html

CFP: Edith Wharton at MLA 2021 (Deadline March 15, 2020)

Edith Wharton Society Call for Papers

Modern Language Association
Toronto, 7–10 January 2021

Edith Wharton’s Masculinities: Beyond the Unsatisfactory Man

In 1991, David Holbrook identified the “unsatisfactory man” in Wharton’s oeuvre. While that assessment remains largely uncontested, the EWS invites presentations on men in Wharton’s work—both fiction and non-fiction—that probes and complicates her treatment of masculinity, including gender normativity and gender fluidity. Any theoretical or contextual approaches welcome.

Please submit titled proposals (approx. 350 words) and a brief CV by March 15, 2020 to Jennifer Haytock at jhaytock@brockport.edu. Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference.

 

CFP: EWS at ALA “Wharton, Bodies, and Mobility” Deadline 12.1.19

Edith Wharton Society Call for Papers

American Literature Association
May 21-25, 2020 San Diego, CA
Wharton, Bodies, and Mobility
The Edith Wharton Society invites papers that explore how Wharton constructs bodies in her work. Panelists might consider (but are not limited to) the following questions:
• How does the representation and/or meaning of bodies change (or not) in different places/settings?
• Who moves and who cannot, and how do bodies facilitate or hinder movement?
• How do bodies mark social acceptance and belonging?
• How does Wharton represent classed or raced bodies?
• What constitutes acceptable or unacceptable bodies?
• How do bodies coincide with upward or downward social and economic mobility?
• What role does the mobility or immobility of bodies (Wharton’s or her characters’) play in her travel writing and other nonfiction works or in depictions of travel in her fiction?
All theoretical approaches welcome, and proposals are encouraged to consider more than one of Wharton’s works, if possible. The session is organized by Gary Totten and Jennifer Haytock on behalf of the EWS. Please submit titled proposals (approx. 350 words) and a brief CV by December 1, 2019 to Jennifer Haytock at jhaytock@brockport.edu. Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference.