Category Archives: CFP

CFP: Edith Wharton panels at SAMLA

FROM TABLEUX VIVANT TO FLASH MOB: CULTURAL CONTINUUMS FROM EDITH WHARTON TO SPENCER TUNICK

 

The Edith Wharton Society invites proposals for a panel at the South Atlantic Modern Language Association Conference (SAMLA 89) to be held in Atlanta, Georgia, November 3-5, 2017.  The conference topic is High Art / Low Art: Borders and Boundaries in Popular Culture. 

Edith Wharton produced a range of cultural products, including canonical novels and short stories, fund-raising anthologies for wartime France, guides to interior design, and travel books. Current popular culture suggests a continuing interest in Wharton, her writings, and those decades that are the focus of her work. Julian Fellows, creator of Downton Abbey, admits that “It is quite true that Edith Wharton has been a tremendous influence on me. . . . I decided, largely because of her work, that it was time I wrote something.” On Wharton’s 150th birthday, Vogue magazine offered an 18-pages to celebrate, including photos by Annie Leibovitz. The Gossip Girl series draws on Whartonian inspiration.  What has driven the renewed attention being paid to the Edwardian and WWI eras in contemporary pop culture?

The Wharton society invites papers that explore a broad range of responses to how Wharton’s art contributes to a continuum of cultural inquiry and commentary that persists to this day in high / low cultural expressions. One might consider such topics as how modern flash mobs reflect or rewrite the tableau vivants of The House of Mirth. How do Wharton’s texts and practices reflect a generational difference (or not) in attitudes toward privacy in (social) media?  How might contemporary short forms or serializations (blog posts, film and music reviews, opinion pieces, etc.) draw on the form and content of her essays, cultural commentaries, letters, or short stories? Does Wharton’s art bear narrative, formal, or thematic similarities to other forms of popular culture, such as soap operas or online TV dramas? Wharton’s travel writing about excursions via automobile might be compared to modern travel blogs, television programming, or websites.  We hope to receive a range of submissions to create lively, even surprising, insights and conversation.

Please submit a 300-500 word abstract, one page CV, and AV requirements via email to Mary Carney, University of North Georgia, at mary.carney@ung.edu by May 12, 2017. 

CFP: SHARP/ Edith Wharton Society at MLA 2018) (Deadline: 3.10.17)

Call for papers – SHARP/ Edith Wharton Society

Session type: Joint Session / Affiliate Organizations

Organizations: Society for the History of Authorship, Reading, and Publishing; Edith Wharton Society

Title of the session: Edith Wharton, Book History and Digital Humanities

Submission requirements: Abstract, 300 words

Deadline for submissions: 10 March 2017

Contact person information: Lise Jaillant (l.jaillant@lboro.ac.uk) OR Paul Ohler (Paul.Ohler@kpu.ca)

 

Book historians have long been interested in Edith Wharton’s transition from “lady to author.” In the late 1950s, Millicent Bell examined the archive of the publisher Charles Scribner to understand Wharton’s growing professionalism and awareness of the market value of her work. With the transatlantic, and transnational turn in book history, scholars have paid attention to the way Wharton managed her career on both sides of the Atlantic, skillfully negotiating rights from book, film and drama sources. “Like other canny literary operators sensitive to the potential of new media outlets for their literary material,” wrote David Finkelstein, “Wharton extracted maximum exposure and financial benefit from appearances in multiple media forms.” This remediation from print to new media is of course of interest to digital humanists, who have brought innovative perspectives to Wharton studies. Another avenue of inquiry has been opened with the digitalization of early-twentieth-century periodicals and the study of the various forms in which Wharton’s texts appeared.

 

This session will showcase new approaches in book history and digital humanities to shed light on Edith Wharton’s work and relationship with her publishers and readers. It will bring together “traditional” and digital humanists to illuminate Wharton’s global career and reception of her work across borders. It will also identify future lines of inquiries and innovative methodologies that will help us better understand one of the most important writers of the early twentieth century. 

 

Paul Ohler Ph.D.

Department of English

Kwantlen Polytechnic University

12666-72nd Avenue

Surrey, British Columbia

V3W 2M8

Canada

President, Edith Wharton Society

Associate Editor, Edith Wharton Review

CFP: EWS Panel at MLA 2018 (deadline 3.15.17)

Edith Wharton Society CFP MLA 2018:  Edith Wharton’s New York

In her memoir, A Backward Glance (1934) Wharton wrote that the New York of her youth was “as much a vanished city . . . as the lowest layer of Schliemann’s Troy.” In her 1899 story “A Cup of Cold Water” the protagonist walks the city on a winter night, moving down Fifth Avenue to Thirty-Fifth Street before he turns east toward Broadway’s middle-class precincts. The story heralds Wharton’s use of New York as a setting for many of her best-known works of fiction. We invite papers that consider the relevance of New York to her depictions, early and late, of urban geography and architecture, social and ethnic diversity, capitalism and cultural entropy, and the “vanished city” of her youth, among other approaches. Proposals might address stories such as “The Other Two” (1904), the novellas of Old New York (1924), and novels such as The House of Mirth (1905), The Custom of the Country (1913), The Age of Innocence (1920), The Mother’s Recompense (1925), and Twilight Sleep (1927). Also welcome are comparative analyses with alternative visions of New York by writers such as Abraham Cahan, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Henry James.

Session type: Allied Organization

Submission requirements: Abstract (300 words) and short CV

Deadline for submissions: 15 March 2017

Contact information: Paul Ohler (paul.ohler@kpu.ca)

CFP: The Edith Wharton Review – Special Issue on Wharton and Religion

The Edith Wharton Review

Call for Papers 

Special Issue: Wharton and Religion

We invite papers exploring any aspect of religion, spirituality, and the sacred in Wharton’s work, including the afterlives of religion in gothic, aestheticism, or satire. How does Wharton conceptualize belief, spirituality, or religious tradition in modernity? What place does the sacred have in her writing, and where are the sacred spaces in her work? Are there distinctive features to Wharton’s discussions of religious architecture or sacred art? What interactions take place between Wharton’s fiction and the Bible, or religious texts and genres? How does Wharton’s anthropological eye address religious movements, practices, or characters? Do recent studies in religious history illuminate new aspects of Wharton’s fiction? Can Wharton’s writing contribute any insights to current post-secular discourse? What does it mean to read Wharton in an age of religious terror? We welcome studies of Wharton in relation to Islam, Judaism, and alternative spiritualities addressed within her work, in addition to the Christianity most familiar to her. We encourage attention to lesser known texts, such as “The Seed of the Faith,” as well as canonical novels like The House of Mirth. Essays should be 4,000-6,000 words in length and submitted online to The Edith Wharton Review with a note that it is for the “Wharton and Religion” Special Issue. Deadline: August 1, 2017.  

CFP: Critical Insights on Edith Wharton (11.20.16)

Call for Papers
Critical Insights:  Edith Wharton

Please see below the call for essays for a forthcoming volume on Edith Wharton. The volume is part of the series Critical Insights (Salem Press) and will appear in fall 2017. More information can be found here:

http://www.salempress.com/critical_insights.html

Following the guidelines for the series, I seek essays (4000-5000 words) that are accessible to high school students and undergraduates, and are meant to:

  • Provide undergraduates with a comprehensive introduction to the author’s works, as well as the various approaches students are likely to encounter and study in their classrooms.
  • Help students build a foundation for studying works in greater depth by introducing them to key concepts, contexts, critical approaches, and vocabulary in literary scholarship.

The format of each volume is standard, and will include:

  • A “biographical” essay (2000 words) that gives an overview of Wharton’s life
  • A “historical background” essay (4000-5000 words) that addresses how the time period influenced Wharton as well as what makes her work relevant to a modern audience. The essay should consider a variety of contexts in which Wharton’s work is usually placed.
  • A “critical reception” essay (4000-5000 words) that reviews the history of critical responses to Wharton’s oeuvre, and addresses the major concerns that scholars have identified over the years. The essay should be a comprehensive overview of criticism rather than a focused analysis of specific perspectives.
  • A “critical lens” essay (4000-5000 words) that offers a close reading of Wharton’s work(s) from a particular critical standpoint (e.g. gender studies, cultural studies, disability studies, etc).
  • A “comparative analysis” essay (4000-5000 words) that analyzes Wharton in the light of another (similar or contemporary) author.

In addition: the volume will include ten 5000-word essays, which will offer various critical readings of Wharton’s work. Topics could address (but are not limited to):

  • Wharton and the First World War; Wharton and race; Wharton and feminism; queer readings of Wharton’s works; Wharton and cosmopolitanism; Wharton and modernism; Wharton as an architectural historian; Wharton’s works in comparison with other writers (American or not); Wharton in a transatlantic context; Wharton and animal studies; Wharton and disability; Wharton and other genres (e.g. Gothic); Wharton in film; Wharton as a travel writer, etc.
  • I welcome topics that reflect the main critical approaches to Wharton’s oeuvre, as well as recent reevaluations of her work. Essays that incorporate a range of Wharton’s texts are strongly encouraged. Readings and approaches should not be dated nor so cutting-edge as to be dated in the next 10 years.

Please send an abstract (500-1000 words) and a brief CV by November 20, 2016 to:

 

Myrto Drizou, PhD

Department of English

Valdosta State University

Valdosta GA 31698

mdrizou@valdosta.edu

 

Notification of acceptance by December 15, 2016. Complete first drafts (5000 words) due by March 15, 2017.

CFP: Age of Innocence – journal issue and book volume

Dear Friends,

It was wonderful to see many of you at the recent “Wharton in Washington 2016″ conference. As we look ahead to future events, we invite you to keep in mind the centenary of Wharton’s The Age of Innocence, which was published in 1920 and won the Pulitzer Prize in 1921. 

As part of the celebration, The Edith Wharton Review is planning a Special Issue on “The Age of Innocence at 100,” scheduled for Winter 2020-Spring 2021. The journal issue will include select essays from the 2020 Edith Wharton Society conference, but the editors also welcome submissions representing new readings of The Age of Innocence or its film adaptations in a post-9/11 age.

Arielle Zibrak is also organizing a book volume, co-edited with Alice Kelly, which aims to situate The Age of Innocence among Wharton’s modern contemporaries and literary descendants, rather than her antecedents, and bring new theoretical methods to bear on readings of her work. 

Calls for Papers are forthcoming, to be sent out as the directors of the 2020 conference are secured in early 2017.

We hope that you will help make the centenary of The Age of Innocence a memorable year of scholarship and reflection. 

With all best wishes,

Sharon Kim

Associate Editor,

The Edith Wharton Review

Announcing

The Age of Innocence Centenary

The Edith Wharton Review Special Issue:

“The Age of Innocence at 100”

Winter 2020-Spring 2021

Deadline for submissions: December 2019.

The Age of Innocence 

Centenary Book Volume

Co-Editors: Arielle Zibrak, Alice Kelly

Deadline for proposal submissions: tba