Category Archives: CFP

Conference Update: Edith Wharton’s New York in 2020

Edith Wharton’s New York:
A Conference Sponsored by the Edith Wharton Society New Yorker Hotel
June 17th-20th 2020

Please join the Edith Wharton Society for its upcoming conference marking the centennial anniversary of the publication of Edith Wharton’s Pulitzer-Prize winning novel, The Age of Innocence. We will celebrate this momentous year in New York, the setting not only of so many of Wharton’s works but also of much of her life.

While all topics are welcome, we are particularly interested in whole panels and individual papers that focus on New York as a geographical and thematic element in Wharton’s life and works. Papers could explore the role of New York City and/or the Hudson River Valley in Wharton’s works, Wharton’s own history with the region, or Wharton’s relationship to place and space more generally. Papers that offer new readings of The Age of Innocence—such as new historical approaches or legacies of The Age of Innocence, the novel’s relationship to other works by Wharton and/or her peers, and adaptations of the novel (for film, theater, etc.)—are also welcome.

Since 1920 marks the beginning of what many consider the “later years” of Wharton’s career, examinations of Edith Wharton’s works in the shifting literary and political foundations of post- WWI society are also of interest. The 20s mark the centennial of other significant Wharton texts, and essays that examine these later works are of particular interest.

In addition, there will be a keynote speaker and opportunities for tours of local attractions. Further details forthcoming.

We welcome submissions for full panels of 4-5 participants and roundtables of 6-7 participants as well as individual paper submissions. Please submit proposals no later than August 1st, 2019 to whartonnewyork@gmail.com

For full panel and roundtable proposals, please submit 200-350-word summaries of each presentation included in the panel or roundtable as well as a brief 50-word bio and A/V requests for each presenter.

For individual paper proposals, please submit a 350-500-word abstract, a brief 50-word bio, and A/V requests as one Word document.

All conference participants must be members of the Edith Wharton Society at the time of registration.

For additional information, contact co-directors at email address above or individually: Margaret Toth (Meg), Manhattan College margaret.toth@manhattan.edu
Margaret Jay Jessee (Jay), University of Alabama at Birmingham mjjessee@uab.edu

CFP: EWS Prizes for 2019

The Edith Wharton Society is delighted to announce three prizes for 2019.  Below please find all calls for submissions.  All submission materials should be sent via email by June 30, 2019 to current EWS President, Melanie Dawson, College of William and Mary, at mvdaws@wm.edu.

The Elsa Nettels Prize for a Beginning Scholar

This award, formerly known as the “Edith Wharton Society Prize for a Beginning Scholar,” established in 2005, recognizes the best unpublished essay on Edith Wharton’s work by a beginning scholar, advanced graduate student, independent scholar, or faculty member who has held a full-time appointment for four or fewer years.  All entries will be considered for publication in The Edition Wharton Review, published by Penn State University Press.  The author of the prize-winning essay will receive an award of $250.  Submissions should be 20-30 double-spaced pages long and follow the 8th edition MLA style, using endnotes rather than footnotes. Submissions should include two attached files: an anonymized MS Word version of your paper and a separate cover letter containing the applicant’s name, essay title, academic status, e-mail address, postal address, and the award name.  Please use the subject line: “EWS Elsa Nettels Prize for a Beginning Scholar.”  Submissions are due to mvdaws@wm.edu by June 30, 2019.

The Edith Wharton Society Award for Archival Research 

The archival award, in the amount of $500, enables a scholar to conduct research at one of the Edith Wharton archives at Wharton’s library at The Mount in Lenox, MA, the Wharton Collection at Yale University’s Beinecke Library, or the Wharton papers at the Harry Ransom Center at the University of Texas.  Submissions should include a proposal (of no more than two single-spaced pages) that describes the applicant’s overarching research project, its contribution to Wharton scholarship, the applicant’s scholarly preparation, and the relevance of the archive to the project’s completion.  Also include two additional attachments: a CV and a separate cover letter containing your current affiliation, rank, and mailing address.

Funds must be used for transportation, lodging, and other expenses related to archival research.  Notification of the award will take place by July 30, 2019.  The award can be used between August 1, 2019 and July 30, 2020.  A brief report detailing some aspect(s) of the research (not intended to preempt publication in other scholarly venues) will be due to the EWS president by September 1, 2020 and will be published in the Edith Wharton Review. Pleas use the subject line: “EWS Award for Archival Research.” Submissions are due to mvdaws@wm.edu by June 30, 2019.

The Edith Wharton Society Undergraduate Research Prize

First offered in 2014, the undergraduate research prize is open to students at all undergraduate levels.  Papers should be no more than fifteen pages long and can address Wharton’s works in any genre.  The winning essay will be published on the EWS website, and the author will receive an award of $100.  Please send an anonymized electronic submission as an email attachment in Microsoft word, along with a separate attached cover letter containing your name, essay title, undergraduate institution, the name of your faculty mentor, e-mail address (and perhaps an alternate email, if your email address is about to change), postal address, and the name of the award. Please use the subject line: “EWS Undergraduate Research Prize.”  Submissions are due to mvdaws@wm.edu by June 30, 2019.

The Edith Wharton Society sees its commitment to Wharton’s writing as including  financial support for Wharton scholarship, with two awards specifically for beginning scholars.  We thank all in the Wharton society who have donated to these prizes over the years, many of whom have been award recipients; your support of this endeavor enables our generosity.  If you are inclined to donate to support this year’s awards, a donation portal is linked in the top menu and here: https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/donate

Edith Wharton’s New York: Conference in 2020

Edith Wharton’s New York: A Conference Sponsored by the Edith Wharton Society
New York, June 2020

(exact dates and location TBD)

Please join the Edith Wharton Society for its upcoming conference marking the centennial anniversary of the publication of Edith Wharton’s Pulitzer-Prize winning novel, The Age of Innocence. We will celebrate this momentous year in New York, the setting not only of so many of Wharton’s works but also of much of her life.

While all topics are welcome, we are particularly interested in whole panels and individual papers that focus on New York as a geographical and thematic element in Wharton’s life and works. Papers could explore the role of New York City and/or the Hudson River Valley in Wharton’s works, Wharton’s own history with the region, or Wharton’s relationship to place and space more generally. Papers that offer new readings of The Age of Innocence—such as new historical approaches or legacies of The Age of Innocence, the novel’s relationship to other works by Wharton and/or her peers, and adaptations of the novel (for film, theater, etc.)—are also welcome.

Since 1920 marks the beginning of what many consider the “later years” of Wharton’s career, examinations of Edith Wharton’s works in the shifting literary and political foundations of post-WWI society are also of interest. The 20s mark the centennial of other significant Wharton texts, and essays that examine these later works are of particular interest.

In addition, there will be a keynote speaker and opportunities for tours of local attractions. Further details forthcoming.

We welcome submissions for full panels of 4-5 participants and roundtables of 6-7 participants as well as individual paper submissions. Please submit proposals no later than August 1st, 2019 to whartonnewyork@gmail.com

For full panel and roundtable proposals, please submit 200-350-word summaries of each presentation included in the panel or roundtable as well as a brief 50-word bio and A/V requests for each presenter.

For individual paper proposals, please submit a 350-500-word abstract, a brief 50-word bio, and A/V requests as one Word document.

All conference participants must be members of the Edith Wharton Society at the time of registration.

 

For additional information, contact co-directors at email address above or individually:

Margaret Toth (Meg), Manhattan College margaret.toth@manhattan.edu

Margaret Jay Jessee (Jay), University of Alabama at Birmingham mjjessee@uab.edu

CFP: Edith Wharton at ALA (Deadline January 7, 2019)

Reposting because the deadline is in 1 week!

Edith Wharton Society Call for Papers
American Literature Association
May 23-26, 2019 Boston, MA

The Edith Wharton Society will sponsor two panels at ALA in 2019. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference, and individuals may participate in only one panel.

The Case for Comparisons

The Edith Wharton Society solicits proposals for a roundtable discussion, comprised of 2 single-spaced-page position papers outlining arguments for studying Wharton’s work in relation to a particular writer and that author’s specific works.  What specific works of Wharton and another author pose compelling possibilities for teaching and/or scholarly work? What theories or histories or contexts would this comparison engage?  What do we gain from studying Wharton’s work comparatively? What potential pitfalls, if any, await us?  250 word proposals, with titles, by Jan. 7 to Melanie Dawson at mvdaws@wm.edu.

Wharton and the Family

The Edith Wharton Society invites proposals for 15-20 minute papers on “Wharton and the Family” for inclusion in the ALA 2019 program in Boston. Proposals may approach any aspect of Wharton and the family, including issues of maternity, paternity, childrearing, sibling relationships,  queer families, and more. Papers may also compare Wharton’s representations of families with those of her contemporaries. Titled proposals (approx. 300 words) are due to Jennifer Haytock (jhaytock@brockport.edu) by January 7, 2019.

 

 

 

 

CFP: “Modernism and Diagnosis” (prospective cluster for the Modernism/modernity Print Plus platform) 

Call for Papers: “Modernism and Diagnosis” (prospective cluster for the Modernism/modernity Print Plus platform)

Edited by Lisa Mendelman and Heather A. Love

Proposed titles & abstracts due March 15, 2019

Selected essays due June 15, 2019

We seek proposals for short, provocative essays addressing the topic of “Modernism and Diagnosis” for a prospective peer-reviewed cluster on Modernism/modernity’s Print Plus platform.

The first decades of the twentieth century saw the proliferation of popular and scientific diagnoses. Ushered in by a standardizing culture of physical and mental health, individual and social measures of wellbeing and pathology abound during these years—from psychoanalysis and eugenics to self-help and the physical culture movement. Contemporary cultural productions drew from and commented on this evolving slew of analytics. Think, for example, of the representations of shell-shocked and institutionalized bodies in print, on stage, and on screen; formalist experiments that play with new models of selfhood through stream-of-consciousness narration and (sincere or satiric) primitivist aesthetics; and sweeping social diagnoses like Gertrude Stein’s “you are all a lost generation.”

This Print Plus cluster invites papers that meditate on these period dynamics and their implications for understanding modernism’s legacy. Individual essays might focus on questions of identification, categorization, epistemology, or ontology raised by modernist aesthetics (e.g., “cases,” dialect, primitivism), popularized discourses like psychoanalysis and eugenics, and evolving academic disciplines including psychiatry, sexology, sociology, anthropology, philosophy, and linguistics. Authors might also engage with the recent turns to cognitive neuroscience and sociology in literary studies, conversations about research methodology, modernist cultures of feeling / affect, and narratives of diagnosis as they pertain to contemporary analytic trends and enduring social categories including race, class, gender, sexuality, and disability.

Papers should be inventive, provocative gestures, along the lines of a conference roundtable (2000-3000 words). We particularly welcome submissions that draw on the unique possibilities afforded by the digital setting of the Print Plus platform. Please send a titled, 300-word abstract and a brief biography to lisa.mendelman@menlo.edu and heather.love@uwaterloo.ca by March 15, 2019. 6 to 8 contributors will be invited to submit essays, after which the entire cluster will be sent out for peer review.

CFP: Edith Wharton Pane at ALA 2019 in Boston (Deadline 12.1.18)

Edith Wharton Society Call for Papers at the American Literature Association
May 23-26, 2019 Boston, MA

Wharton and the Family

The Edith Wharton Society invites proposals for papers on “Wharton and the Family” for inclusion in the ALA 2019 program in Boston. Proposals may approach any aspect of Wharton and the family, including issues of maternity, paternity, childrearing, sibling relationships,  queer families, and more. Papers may also compare Wharton’s representations of families with those of her contemporaries. Titled proposals (approx. 300 words) are due to Jennifer Haytock (jhaytock@brockport.edu) by December 1, 2018. Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference.