Category Archives: Wharton in the News

Wharton in the News: A Motor-Flight through France

From First Things, https://www.firstthings.com/web-exclusives/2019/07/what-she-asks-she-obtains

Though Adams was anxious about the reckless acceleration of history, his friend Edith Wharton mashed her foot down on the accelerator in her Motor Flight Through France. Dogmatically confident in her own taste, she shunned the popular artworks starred in guide books. She stopped in Rouen and stumbled upon Gerhard David’s Virgin Among The Virgins. She named it “The Virgin of the Grapes” for the “heavenly translucence of that bunch of grapes plucked from the vine of Paradise” held by the Infant Jesus on the Virgin’s lap. “It is part of its very charm to leave unsettled, to keep among the mysteries whereby it draws one back,” she wrote. Wharton drove on to the next town, but the Virgin stayed with her. Father John LaFarge, S.J., remembers being quietly interrogated about his religious beliefs by Wharton “as if she were looking for something desperately needed, but only vaguely knowing her own needs.”

Wharton in the News: Who was Edith Wharton’s father? in the TLS

Via Anna Girling. Note: it’s behind a paywall, so I have no idea what’s beyond this excerpt.

https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/private/mystery-writers-edith-wharton-father/

Mystery writers

Who was Edith Wharton’s father?

As research assistant to R. W. B. Lewis, the prize-winning biographer of Edith Wharton, Marion Mainwaring – assigned in 1969 to investigate Wharton’s “Parisian phase” – found herself knocking on forbidding doors in unpredictable arrondissements of Paris, in far-flung hôtels de ville and at a remote psychiatric hospital in the French countryside as she doggedly pursued every shred of information she could find about a wily, elusive American expatriate named William Morton Fullerton. Fullerton (1865–1952), a Harvard graduate and a correspondent for The Times in Paris, was a roué and conman, a cosmopolitan libertine with a proclivity for the upper crust and satyr-like propensities for bisexual romantic entanglements (a wistful Henry James opined that he was “dazzling” but “not kind”), and chronically in debt because he was being blackmailed by a former mistress. He was also briefly, but pivotally and inexplicably, Wharton’s lover.

Edith Wharton’s unpublished play “The Shadow of a Doubt” on BBC Radio 3, Sunday, 10/28

This programme will be available shortly after broadcast

The Shadow of a Doubt

Phoebe Fox, Francesca Annis and Paul Ready star in the world premiere of a newly discovered play by Edith Wharton from 1901. Former nurse Kate Derwent carries a terrible secret.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/m0000xfl
Introduced by Dr. Laura Rattray.

Listen to more Wharton information here:

Listen now

Edith Wharton

Melvyn Bragg and guests discuss Wharton’s novels, which explore the world of the privileged in America’s Gilded Age, in which she lived, written in hindsight and with little mercy.

Wharton in the News: “The Lady’s Maid’s Bell” production in Auckland, New Zealand.

Dear Sir/Madam,
I am writing to notify you of my stage adaptation of The Lady’s Maid’s Bell for a local community theatre here in Auckland, New Zealand. As far as I am aware this will be the first stage production of The Lady’s Maid’s Bell since the story was first published. If you have any members in Auckland, the following information may be of interest to them:
The Lady’s Maid’s Bell by Edith Wharton plays nightly at 7.30pm at The Pumphouse Theatre, Takapuna from 9th to 13th October.
If you require any further information please do not hesitate to contact me.
Thank you.
Kind regards,
Jason Moffatt

Wharton in the News: Shadow of a Doubt Production in New York

Edith Wharton’s

THE SHADOW OF A DOUBT

Monday, January 28, 2019

7:30 PM
Lucille Lortel Theatre

Single Tickets go on-sale October 22.

Directed by Adrienne Campbell-Holt
Featuring  Emily Brown, Kate Burton, Marin Ireland, and Jay O. Sanders and more to be announced!

“My dear, after twenty, all life is pretending, and it’s easier to pretend in a good house, than alone in a garret!” advises Lady Uske, urging our heroine Kate to return home to her husband, in Edith Wharton’s long-lost drama. Written 20 years before The Age of Innocence earned her the first Pulitzer Prize for Literature to be awarded to a woman, Wharton’s The Shadow of a Doubt contains kernels of the socially conscious characters and themes of her later masterpiece novels.

[read the rest at https://www.redbulltheater.com/the-shadow-of-a-doubt]

INTERVIEW WITH VIRGINIA RICARD, TRANSLATOR OF NEWLY DISCOVERED EDITH WHARTON LECTURE “FRANCE AND ITS ALLIES AT WAR”

p3_WhartonOn February 14, 2018, the Times Literary Supplement published a newly discovered lecture by Edith Wharton, “France and Its Allies at War: The Witnesses Speak,” translated by Virginia Ricard (University of Bordeaux).   Professor Ricard is co-editor of volume 29, Translations and Adaptations, of the Complete Works of Edith Wharton, a 30-volume series under contract at Oxford University Press.

The entire lecture is online at https://www.the-tls.co.uk/articles/public/america-at-war-wharton/ (Image courtesy of this site.)

Read the rest of this interview at the Complete Works of Edith Wharton site, https://whartoncompleteworks.org

  1. How did you happen to discover this piece?

In France we have an extraordinary tool, Gallica, a digital library created by the Bibliothèque nationale. Like the Internet Archive, it constantly expands the amount of material it makes available and improves accessibility. Over the years, I have downloaded anything and everything concerning Wharton or by Wharton that I found on Gallica. “L’Amérique en guerre” was published in the Revue hébdomadaire on 2 March 1918, and the review was uploaded by Gallica in December 2013. I read the lecture, among other things, soon afterwards. But it was in Washington, in July 2016, as I listened to Alan Price’s paper that I realized just how interesting it was. So the credit really goes to Alan. When I began looking at the translation work required for the Complete Works of Edith Wharton, I realized that “L’Amérique en guerre” had never been published in English and so I set to work on it. As I did so, I thought 2018 seemed the right moment to publish it—just a hundred years after Wharton gave her lecture and a little over a hundred years after the United States entered the war—still an important event in Europe although I think all but forgotten in the United-States.

  1. What can you tell us about this lecture? Do we know how it was received by those who heard it?

“L’Amérique en guerre” was part of a series organized in 1918 by the Société des conferences, that is, a lecture society that worked closely with the Revue hébdomadaire in which the lectures were regularly published. This particular lecture was one of ten called Paroles de témoinsThe Witnesses Speak. The nine other speakers were politicians, members of the Church, and writers, all closely involved in the conflict for various reasons. I think is is pretty clear why the organisers asked Wharton to take part. She had influenced American opinion, which the French saw as an essential factor in the American decision to enter the war, and she had contributed to the war effort in France. So she was, in that sense, “a witness.”