Category Archives: Announcements

Dr. Rita Bode: “In a Great Tradition: Edith Wharton and Women Writers” January 26, 2022 (5 p.m. UK, noon EST)

Tomorrow!

The Edith Wharton Society

To celebrate the week of Edith Wharton’s birthday, the Edith Wharton Society and the Transatlantic Literary Women are joining forces to hold a special talk with renowned Wharton scholar Dr Rita Bode. If you need any more persuasion, Rita is also of course the incoming new editor of theEdith Wharton Review.

Please join us for Rita’s special talk on: “In a Great Tradition: Edith Wharton and Women Writers”. Details of the talk are available here:https://transatlanticladies.wordpress.com/2022/01/10/january-tea-with-tlw-a-wharton-birthday-special-with-dr-rita-bode%EF%BF%BC/

January Tea with TLW: A Wharton Birthday Special with Dr Rita Bode – Transatlantic Literary WomenEdith Wharton’s Birthday TalkDr Rita Bode on ‘In a Great Tradition: Edith Wharton and Women Writers’Wednesday 26 January 2022 (5pm UK time; noon New York) A Joint Event with the Edith Wharton Society and the Transatlantic Literary Women To begin the 2022 Tea with TLW series, and celebrate the week of Edith Wharton’s birthday, the…transatlanticladies.wordpress.com

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Extended Deadline (January 24, 2022): Bodies and Mobility in Wharton and Her Contemporaries, ALA 2022

EXTENDED DEADLINE: JANUARY 24, 2022 – Bodies and Mobility in Wharton and Her Contemporaries, ALA 2022

The Edith Wharton Society invites papers that explore how Wharton and her contemporaries represent bodies and mobility in their work. Panelists are especially encouraged to consider comparative analyses of Wharton’s work on this subject in relation to her contemporary writers. All theoretical approaches are welcome. Proposals might consider (but are not limited to) the following questions:

·       How does the representation and/or meaning of bodies change (or not) in different places/settings? 

·       Who moves and who cannot, and how do bodies facilitate or hinder movement? 

·       How do bodies mark social acceptance and belonging? 

·       How do Wharton and her contemporaries represent raced, gendered, or classed bodies? 

·       What constitutes acceptable or unacceptable bodies? 

·       How do bodies coincide with upward or downward social and economic mobility? 

·       What role does the mobility or immobility of bodies (Wharton’s, her contemporaries’ or their characters’) play in travel writing and other nonfiction works, or in depictions of travel in fiction? 

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract and a brief CV by January 24, 2022 to gary.totten@unlv.edu

Reminder: EWS Panels at ALA–Deadline is January 10, 2022

Bodies and Mobility in Wharton and Her Contemporaries

Panel One:

The Edith Wharton Society invites papers that explore how Wharton and her contemporaries represent bodies and mobility in their work. Panelists are especially encouraged to consider comparative analyses of Wharton’s work on this subject in relation to her contemporary writers. All theoretical approaches are welcome. Proposals might consider (but are not limited to) the following questions:

  • How does the representation and/or meaning of bodies change (or not) in different places/settings?
  • Who moves and who cannot, and how do bodies facilitate or hinder movement?
  • How do bodies mark social acceptance and belonging?
  • How do Wharton and her contemporaries represent gendered, classed, or raced bodies?
  • What constitutes acceptable or unacceptable bodies?
  • How do bodies coincide with upward or downward social and economic mobility?
  • What role does the mobility or immobility of bodies (Wharton’s, her contemporaries’ or their characters’) play in travel writing and other nonfiction works, or in depictions of travel in fiction?

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract and a brief CV by January 10, 2022 to Gary Totten (gary.totten@unlv.edu). Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference.

Panel Two:

Revisiting Edith Wharton’s Short Stories

The Edith Wharton Society invites papers that explore how Wharton engages with the form of the short story throughout her career. Panelists are encouraged to consider Wharton’s lesser-known stories as well as comparative analyses in relation to Wharton’s contemporary writers. All theoretical approaches are welcome. Proposals might consider (but are not limited to) the following questions:

  • How does Wharton’s short fiction converse with turn-of-the-century literary movements, including realism, naturalism, regionalism, and modernism?
  • How does Wharton work with specific short story genres, such as the ghost story?
  • How does Wharton address questions of race, ethnicity, gender, ability, and age throughout her short fiction?
  • How do themes and tropes in short stories complement (or conflict with) Wharton’s novels, poems, plays, and non-fiction works?
  • How do short stories represent issues of illness, contamination, and risk, in particular?
  • How do short stories shed light upon established readings of Wharton’s major novels or other writings?
  • How does the short story’s economy of form work within the economy of capitalism and the literary market?

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract and a brief CV by January 10, 2022 to Myrto Drizou (myrto.drizou@boun.edu.tr). Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference.

Queries: How to join the Edith Wharton Society

Comment: I am interested in becoming a member of EWS, but I can’t seem to locate the necessary link by which to begin the process. Any assistance will be appreciated.

 Richmond Adams

Reply: The EWS welcomes new members! To join, click on Membership in the menu bar at the top of the page or go here: https://edithwhartonsociety.wordpress.com/membership/.

If you scroll down, you’ll see a series of PayPal links that will let you pay for membership and enroll you as a member.

Sincerely,

Donna Campbell

CFP: Edith Wharton Sessions at ALA 2022 (Chicago); Deadline January 10, 2022.

Edith Wharton Society Call for Papers
American Literature Association (ALA) Conference 2022
May 26-29 (Chicago, IL)

———-

Bodies and Mobility in Wharton and Her Contemporaries

Panel One:

The Edith Wharton Society invites papers that explore how Wharton and her contemporaries represent bodies and mobility in their work. Panelists are especially encouraged to consider comparative analyses of Wharton’s work on this subject in relation to her contemporary writers. All theoretical approaches are welcome. Proposals might consider (but are not limited to) the following questions:

  • How does the representation and/or meaning of bodies change (or not) in different places/settings?
  • Who moves and who cannot, and how do bodies facilitate or hinder movement?
  • How do bodies mark social acceptance and belonging?
  • How do Wharton and her contemporaries represent gendered, classed, or raced bodies?
  • What constitutes acceptable or unacceptable bodies?
  • How do bodies coincide with upward or downward social and economic mobility?
  • What role does the mobility or immobility of bodies (Wharton’s, her contemporaries’ or their characters’) play in travel writing and other nonfiction works, or in depictions of travel in fiction?

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract and a brief CV by January 10, 2022 to Gary Totten (gary.totten@unlv.edu). Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference.

Panel Two:

Revisiting Edith Wharton’s Short Stories

The Edith Wharton Society invites papers that explore how Wharton engages with the form of the short story throughout her career. Panelists are encouraged to consider Wharton’s lesser-known stories as well as comparative analyses in relation to Wharton’s contemporary writers. All theoretical approaches are welcome. Proposals might consider (but are not limited to) the following questions:

  • How does Wharton’s short fiction converse with turn-of-the-century literary movements, including realism, naturalism, regionalism, and modernism?
  • How does Wharton work with specific short story genres, such as the ghost story?
  • How does Wharton address questions of race, ethnicity, gender, ability, and age throughout her short fiction?
  • How do themes and tropes in short stories complement (or conflict with) Wharton’s novels, poems, plays, and non-fiction works?
  • How do short stories represent issues of illness, contamination, and risk, in particular?
  • How do short stories shed light upon established readings of Wharton’s major novels or other writings?
  • How does the short story’s economy of form work within the economy of capitalism and the literary market?

Please submit a 250-300 word abstract and a brief CV by January 10, 2022 to Myrto Drizou (myrto.drizou@boun.edu.tr). Please include any requests for AV needs in your proposal. Scholars whose proposals are accepted must be members in good standing of the Edith Wharton Society by the time of the conference.

2021 EWS Awards Announced

Dear Edith Wharton Society members, 

I’m delighted to announce this year’s winners of the Edith Wharton Society awards: 

The Elsa Nettels Prize for a Beginning Scholar 

Emma Aylor, Texas Tech University 

“’Nay, rather, Lord, between’: The Unification of Body and Spirit in Wharton’s Deathbed Monologues” 

The Award for Archival Research  

Lina Geriguis, Cabrillo College   

“Wharton, Equity, and Editorial Decisions: Authorial Agency in Shaping the Disability Discourse in the Rare Editions of Ethan Frome” 

The Undergraduate Research Prize 

Alp Eren Pirli, Boğaziçi University 

“Telegraphic Naturalism: Technological Determinism in The Reef” 

I’m pleased that we had robust submissions this year, and I wish to extend many thanks to the Awards committees for their careful and thoughtful work: for the Elsa Nettels Prize: Myrto Drizou, Donna Campbell, and Laura Rattray; for the Award for Archival Research: Melanie Dawson, Sheila Liming, and Meg Toth; and for the Undergraduate Research Prize: Jay Jessee and Virginia Ricard. 

Many congratulations to the winners! It’s a joy to see such strong scholarship on Edith Wharton and her work. 

All best, 

Jennifer 

Dr. Jennifer Haytock
Professor, English Department

Last Call for New Books Week (due Friday, July 16).

Dear Whartonites–

Last call for “New Books Week”; I’ll include everything received up through this Friday, July 16.

On 7/1/21, 12:32 PM, “Wharton-l on behalf of Campbell, Donna M.” <wharton-l-bounces@lists.wsu.edu on behalf of campbelld@wsu.edu> wrote:

    Dear Whartonites,

    Last summer, the EWS site had a “New Books Week” featuring books and articles on Wharton, and we’d like to do the same this year.

    If you’ve published a new book or article about Wharton in 2021, please send me (whartonqueries@gmail.com or campbelld@wsu.edu) information that can be copied & pasted to the site along with a link, and it will be featured at the site, which links to Facebook and Twitter as well.

    Best,

    Donna

Call for Titles: New Books Week at the EWS site

Dear Whartonites,

Last summer, the EWS site had a “New Books Week” featuring books and articles on Wharton, and we’d like to do the same this year.

If you’ve published a new book or article about Wharton in 2021, please send me (whartonqueries@gmail.com or campbelld@wsu.edu) information that can be copied & pasted to the site along with a link, and it will be featured at the site, which links to Facebook and Twitter as well.