Deadline for Approaches to Teaching the Works of Edith Wharton Extended to February 28, 2018.

Deadline for Approaches to Teaching the Works of Edith Wharton Extended to February 28, 2018.

The deadline to contribute to the survey and send a proposal to a Modern Language Association (MLA) volume, Approaches to Teaching the Works of Edith Wharton, edited by Ferdâ Asya, is extended to Wednesday, February 28, 2018.

You can contribute to the volume by completing a survey about your experiences of teaching Wharton’s works. The names of all contributors to the survey will be mentioned in the published volume.

 

You also can propose an essay for the volume. If you would like to propose an original essay for the volume, please submit an abstract of approximately 500 words in which you describe your approach or topic and explain its usefulness for both students and instructors. The focus of your essay should be pedagogical and the abstract should be as specific as possible. Proposed essays should not be previously published.

 

Please also attach a short CV.

Please send your abstract and CV to Ferdâ Asya electronically at fasya@bloomu.edu by February 28, 2018.

 

You may send any supplemental materials such as course descriptions, course plans, syllabi, assignments, bibliographies, or other relevant documents as separate attachments (.doc, .docx, .rtf, or .pdf) or by surface mail to Ferdâ Asya at Department of English, 111A Bakeless Center for the Humanities, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, 400 East Second Street, Bloomsburg, PA 17815.

 

The information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey.

 

The survey for Approaches to Teaching the Works of Edith Wharton is also available here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/att-Wharton

 

For other questions, please contact Ferdâ Asya at fasya@bloomu.edu.

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Wharton Queries: What makes Wharton a significant short story writer?

I am currently an undergraduate at the University of Suffolk in the UK and in my second year of a BA Hons in English. Our current assignment is an overview and appraisal of a significant short story writer and I have chosen to write about Edith Wharton.

Would you therefore be able to suggest why Edith Wharton is so significant in the field of Short Story writers and why the popularity of her short stories still endures. Also, if you think her short stories were instrumental in bringing about social awareness and change for women?

Thank you very much in advance.

Caroline Roberts
Undergraduate

s184868@ucs.ac.uk

Wharton Queries: Teachable EW story involving gender and class?

Hello Wharton-loving friends,
I’m a high school teacher about to move my students from a unit on Jane Eyre into American literature including Fitzgerald, Hemingway, and some contemporary writers. I wish we had time to read Ethan Frome, but we don’t. Is there a Wharton short story you would particularly recommend as relatively accessible, relatively short, and interested in the matters of gender and class that interest my students?
Gratefully,
Lelac.

Queries: House of Mirth illustration

Although I read Edith Wharton’s novel The Age of Innocence (1920) before reading her novel The House of Mirth (1905),
I am curious to know in which book and in which chapter does the text for the illustration that reads…
“She lingered on the broad stairway, looking down into the hall below”, appear?

Thanks

 —
This illustration is the frontispiece for The House of Mirth and appears opposite the title page; I’ve just added this information, which wasn’t available before. It is from Chapter 3, page 38 of the first edition. You can see it and other illustrations at http://public.wsu.edu/~campbelld/wharton/hmirth1.html.
–Donna Campbell

CFP: Deadline for MLA Volume on Wharton Extended to 1/8/18

The deadline to contribute to the survey and send a proposal to a Modern Language Association (MLA) volume, Approaches to Teaching the Works of Edith Wharton, is extended to January 8, 2018.

The volume Approaches to Teaching the Works of Edith Wharton, edited by Ferdâ Asya (Professor of English, 111A Bakeless Center for the Humanities, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, 400 East Second Street, Bloomsburg, PA 17815; fasya@bloomu.edu), is now in development in the MLA series Approaches to Teaching World Literature.

You can contribute to the volume by completing a survey about your experiences of teaching Wharton’s works. The names of all contributors to the survey will be mentioned in the published volume.

You also can propose an essay for the volume. If you would like to propose an original essay for the volume, please submit an abstract of approximately 500 words in which you describe your approach or topic and explain its usefulness for both students and instructors. The focus of your essay should be pedagogical and the abstract should be as specific as possible. Proposed essays should not be previously published.

Please also attach a short CV.

Please send your abstract and CV to Ferdâ Asya electronically at fasya@bloomu.edu by January 8, 2018.

You may send any supplemental materials such as course descriptions, course plans, syllabi, assignments, bibliographies, or other relevant documents as separate attachments (.doc, .docx, .rtf, or .pdf) or by surface mail to Ferdâ Asya at Department of English, 111A Bakeless Center for the Humanities, Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, 400 East Second Street, Bloomsburg, PA 17815.

The information about proposing an essay is available at the end of the survey.

The survey for Approaches to Teaching the Works of Edith Wharton is also available here: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/att-Wharton

For other questions, please contact Ferdâ Asya at fasya@bloomu.edu.

Wharton in the News: Play “Shadow of a Doubt” in Washington, D. C.

This is definitely not Edith Wharton’s only play, but here’s the information for the Shadow of a Doubt staged reading in Washington on November 13.

“The Shadow of a Doubt.” Edith Wharton’s only play gets a free staged reading as part of the Shakespeare Theatre Company’s “Re:Discovery” series. Nov. 13 at the Lansburgh Theatre, 450 7th St. NW. Free. Call 202-547-1122 or visit shakespearetheatre.org.

Via https://www.washingtonpost.com/entertainment/theater_dance/dc-theater-friday-from-trump-y-vicuna-to-pajama-game/2017/11/09/4e3f7104-c4c2-11e7-aae0-cb18a8c29c65_story.html?utm_term=.ad98cd999e66